Vladimir Putins secret gymnast lover gives birth to twins in Moscow VIP

first_imgRussia’s President Vladimir PutinLUDOVIC MARIN/AFP/Getty ImagesAlina Kabaeva, the 36-year-old ex-gymnast who is the secret lover of Russian president Vladimir Putin has given birth to twins, reports coming out of Moscow revealed. Even though there is no official confirmation from Kremlin or Kabaeva regarding the relationship, many believe that the Olympic gold medallist has long been associated with the Russian president.Sergei Kanev, an investigative journalist close to the Russian intelligence services revealed that the entire VIP fourth floor at the Kulakov Research Centre for Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Perinatology was completely cleared earlier this month before admitting Kabaeva for delivery. Kanev claims that Federal Protective Officers conducted a thorough check in every corner of the maternity hospital before Kabaeva’s arrival.”Half of the medical team was kicked out of the delivery ward. A famous doctor from Italy was the key to helping the birth with the assistance of academician Gennady Sukhikh, director of the medical center. The mother was delivered of two boys. However, a C-section had to be performed,” said Kanev, the Sun reports.However, Kanev did not name the Italian doctor who reached Russia for Kabaeva’s delivery.It should be noted that Vladimir Putin was married to Lyudmila Shkrebneva, and the couple has two daughters, 34-year-old Maria, and 32-year-old Yekaterina. The couple who got married in 1983 parted ways in 2014, thus ending 31 years of togetherness.It was after his divorce that Kabaeva’s name started popping up with the president. Interestingly, Kabaeva appeared several times in front of the public with a seemingly wedding ring on her fingers, and this made many people believe that Putin has secretly married her.There are also claims that the couple had already given birth to their first son in 2015 from a Swiss Clinic. Several reports also allege that Kabaeva has a fleet of jets for her service, and she also enjoys top-category security with the protection of armed soldiers.last_img read more

BNP leader Farroque sent to jail on surrender

first_imgA Dhaka court on Sunday sent opposition Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) leader Joynal Abdin Farroque to jail when he surrendered before it in four arson cases filed with Paltan police station in 2015, reports UNB.Metropolitan magistrate Nurunnahar Yasmeen rejected the bail petitions filed by the BNP leader.However, the court granted him bail in two other arson cases.All the cases were filed with the Paltan police station against Farroque during the countrywide blockade enforced by the BNP-led 20-party alliance in 2015.last_img

Clinton Foundation hacker to plead guilty

first_imgTimothy SedlakA Florida man accused of trying to hack the Clinton Foundation in 2015 is expected to plead guilty on Thursday, months after he was sentenced in a related case to 42 years in prison over child pornography discovered on his computers during the probe.Timothy Sedlak, 43, is scheduled to plead guilty in federal court in Manhattan, according to court records. Prosecutors accused him in September 2015 of trying to gain access to an unnamed New York-based global charitable organisation’s network.Prosecutors have never named the organization. But a court filing obtained by Reuters said US Secret Service agents in 2015 questioned Sedlak about notes they found referencing former Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea Clinton.Sedlak, who called himself a private investigator, told the agents he was researching whether charities were unintentionally providing funding to Islamic militant groups, and said the Clintons “came up in his research,” the filing said.The filing’s description of the Clintons matched prosecutors’ descriptions of two previously unnamed individuals who were said to be an “executive” at the charity and an “individual who has been publicly affiliated” with it.Chelsea Clinton is the vice chair of Clinton Foundation, which was founded by her father, former US president Bill Clinton. Its full name is the Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation.The filing, a summary of a Secret Service agent’s interview with Sedlak, was downloaded by Reuters on Feb. 3 and soon after was replaced by a redacted version removing the Clintons’ names.A spokeswoman for Manhattan US attorney Preet Bharara and Sedlak’s lawyer declined comment. Clinton Foundation representatives did not respond to requests for comment.The investigation into Sedlak, of Ocoee, Florida, predated probes into cyber attacks on Democrats during the 2016 presidential election.US intelligence agencies in January released an assessment that Russian president Vladimir Putin ordered a covert effort through the cyber attacks to help Republican Donald Trump’s electoral chances by discrediting Clinton.Prosecutors have said that Sedlak launched about 390,000 unsuccessful attempts to gain unauthorized access to the charitable organisation’s computer network.Following his arrest, authorities discovered files on his computers containing child pornography, including a number of images depicting Sedlak himself sexually abusing a toddler, prosecutors said.Sedlak as a result was separately charged in Florida, where a federal jury in Orlando in May found him guilty on charges including that he produced and possessed child pornography. He was sentenced in August to 42 years in prison.last_img read more

Newlywed housewife beaten dead

first_imgProthom Alo IllustrationA newlywed housewife was beaten to death allegedly by her in-laws over family feud at Deogaon village in Sadar upazila early Thursday.The deceased was Sushila Rani, 20, wife of Bipul Chandra of the village.Victim’s family said Sushila was married to Bipul barely two and a half months ago and since then, Bipul had been torturing her as she protested against his alleged extramarital affairs and drug addiction.Victim’s sister said the body of Sushila was found in a toilet of Bipul’s house in the morning. The body was bleeding and it bore multiple injury marks on her check, throat and forehead, she claimed.Officer-in-charge of Sadar police station Mostafizur Rahman said the body was sent to Sadar Hospital for autopsy.The reason behind the death will be cleared after getting the post-mortem report, he said.last_img read more

Former MP Lobi quits BNP

first_imgAli Asghar LobiFormer MP and party’s executive committee member Ali Asghar Lobi has quit BNP on health grounds, reports UNB.Lobi, also ex-president of Bangladesh Cricket Board (BCB) and former convener of Khulna city unit BNP, sent his resignation letter to BNP secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir on 24 January last, his personal secretary Farhin Akhter told local reporters on Monday.In the resignation letter, she said, Lobi mentioned that he decided to quit politics as he has been suffering from various diseases.Lobi was elected MP in the by-election to the Khulna-2 constituency, vacated by BNP chairperson Khaleda in the 2001 election.He was an influential leader of BNP during the party’s rule from 2001-2006 due to his close ties with Khaleda’s son Tarique Rahman.Lobi was arrested by the joint forces on 6 February, 2007 during the 1/11 political changeover, and got released on bail early 2009. Later, he became inactive in politics.last_img read more

China evokes patriotism as trade conflict with US soars

first_imgThe trade war with the United States will only make China stronger and will never bring the country to its knees, the ruling Communist Party’s People’s Daily wrote in a front-page commentary that evoked the patriotic spirit of past wars.Beijing has yet to say whether or how it will retaliate to the latest escalation in trade tensions, which saw Washington put telecoms equipment giant Huawei Technologies Co Ltd on a blacklist that will make it extremely difficult for the telecom giant to do business with US companies.The world’s two largest economies are locked in an increasingly acrimonious trade dispute that has seen them level escalating tariffs on each other’s imports in the midst of negotiations, adding to fears about risks to global growth and knocking financial markets.The United States is not sincere about wanting to resume trade talks with China and has damaged the atmosphere for negotiations with its recent moves, a state media social media account said.Without sincerity there was no point in coming for talks and nothing to talk about, Taoran Notes, a WeChat account run by the Economic Daily, said in a post late on Thursday that was re-posted by the ruling Communist Party’s official People’s Daily.China, which reported unexpectedly weak growth in retail sales and industrial output on Wednesday, also said on Friday that the impact of trade frictions on its economy was “controllable”.”(We will) fully study the impact of the additional tariffs imposed by the United States, and promptly introduce countermeasures as needed to ensure that the economy operates within a reasonable range,” Meng Wei, a spokeswoman for the National Development and Reform Committee (NDRC), told a media briefing on Friday.In Friday’s commentary, the ruling party’s official newspaper described China’s determination to protect its national interests and dignity as being as “firm as a boulder”.”The trade war can’t bring China down. It will only harden us to grow stronger,” it said.”What kind of storms have not been seen, what bumps have not experienced for China, with its more than 5,000 years of civilization? In the face of hurricanes, the nearly 1.4 billion Chinese people have confidence and stamina.”‘Wheel of Destiny’Huawei’s Hisilicon unit, which purchases US semiconductors for its parent, has been secretly developing back-up products for years in case Huawei was one day unable to obtain the advanced chips and technology it buys from the United States, its president told staff in a letter on Friday.”Today, the wheel of destiny has turned and we have arrived at this extreme and dark moment, as a super-nation ruthlessly disrupts the world’s technology and industry system,” according to the letter.Chinese state television has this week invoked a war theme, focusing on the 1950-1953 conflict between the two Koreas that saw Chinese troops back North Korea while the South was supported by the United States.On Thursday, China Central Television replaced a programme about the ongoing Asian Film and TV Week with a 1964 Chinese movie on the Korean War, “Heroic Sons and Daughters.”On Friday night, the broadcaster will screen yet another Chinese war movie classic, “Battle on Shangganling Mountain”, the scene of a large-scale battle in North Korea, according to a post on its social media account.The post received widespread approval from Chinese social media users, with one even asking when the broadcaster would air a movie on the attack on Pearl Harbor.”Defeat the American imperialists!” another wrote.last_img read more

Pollution of a sacred river becomes a symbol for Indias environmental challenge

first_img News • Photos of the Week By: Priyadarshini Sen Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! A United Methodist group proposes a denominational breakup Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,BANGALORE, India (RNS) — In the pre-dawn light, Srikara Sudarshana circumambulates the Gali Anjaneya Swami Temple at a busy intersection in this city in southern India, known as the country’s tech capital.The 20-year-old priest chants Sanskrit mantras in front of a 700-year-old saffron-colored idol of the god Hanuman. According to ancient tradition the priest then bathes the deity, but instead of using water from the nearby Vrishabhavathi River, Sudarshana cleanses the idol with 30 liters of filtered water from the temple’s kitchen.The temple, one of Bangalore’s historic treasures depicting scenes from the Indian epic Ramayana, is flanked by factories producing lead acid batteries and textiles. The Vrishabhavathi, choked with industrial waste, gives off a noxious odor.“It’s no longer a river but a frothing mass of sewage discharged from industrial, agricultural and residential areas of the catchment,” said Sudarshana.It wasn’t so long ago when the Vrishabhavathi’s waters were potable. According to local myth, the river originated from the hoof of a sacred bull at a hillock nearby. A tributary of one of the most important rivers in India, the Kaveri, it was a key artery and source of livelihood for Bangalore’s residents and farmers.Priest Srikara Sudarshana feeds filtered water to an idol of Hanuman god at Gali Anjaneya Swami Temple in Bangalore, India. RNS photo by Priyadarshini Sen“The bull is believed to be the vehicle of Lord Shiva, the source of creation and destruction of the universe,” said Tulasi Srinivas, a professor of anthropology at Emerson College in Boston, who has been studying water scarcity in Bangalore over the past decade. “It is incumbent that out of this destruction we must find new ways of re-creating our ecology.”When the Vrishabhavathi flowed past the Hanuman temple as a pristine river, devotees bathed before entering the temple complex holding pitchers of holy water.“The water was so pure our forefathers could even drink it,” said Srinivasa Ramanuja, a senior priest wearing a single piece of unstitched cloth and girdle around his waist. “During the rains, it would enter the temple and caress the feet of lord Hanuman.”But with the tech boom in Bangalore in the early 1990s, the city’s growth, fueled by successive governments’ ambitious agendas, outstripped its waste management plans.Trees around catchment areas of lakes were cut down and aquifers were tapped to build out suburbs. As a result, the lakes dried up and the city government gave permits to private institutions to build on the lake bed.In 2017, the World Economic Forum named Bangalore the world’s most dynamic city for its entrepreneurial spirit, innovation and technology, as well as its salubrious climate. But while paper mills, chemical and electroplating plants, textiles, distilleries, tanneries and rubber factories sprung up everywhere, attracting skilled workforces from around the world, they also discharged their effluents into the river.Trash floats in the Vrishabhavathi River near the Gali Anjaneya Swami Temple in Bangalore, India. RNS photo by Priyadarshini SenEven the Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board, overburdened by the city’s waste, connected the sewer lines to the river. It permitted the effluents to pollute the river to such an extent that marine life was killed off.Besides its effect on ritual observances, the frothing mass of water that flows past the temple today is a potential health risk. Villagers downstream complain of diseases such as gastroenteritis, cancer and abdominal, heart, skin and kidney ailments.“The pollution control board has connived with industries to violate environmental norms. Law enforcement agencies should be held accountable,” said Yellappa Reddy, the chairman of Bangalore Environment Trust, an nongovernmental organization of scientists in the city.Enraged by the negligence of government agencies and politicians, Reddy plans to file a petition at the Karnataka high court this month.Politicians and Hindu nationalists, many of whom are frequent visitors to the temple, are accused of turning a blind eye to the toxicity of the river despite the protests.“Priests are ready to take action if leaders support the resuscitation of our river,” said 55-year-old Ramachandra Bhattacharya, who pours libations on the deity every day. “Even though the public works department has been told to step up their work, the government officers are simply dragging their feet,” he said.UB City, a luxury mall, dominates the skyline of Bangalore, India. The city has seen a major tech boom since the 1990s. Photo by Prateek Karandikar/Creative CommonsIn 2014, the Bangalore Municipal Corp. installed flood control gates around the temple to prevent the river water from entering the inner sanctum during heavy rains.Even then, the priests complained that the development of the temple was not enough if the environment around their place of worship was not sanitized.“Now, garbage trucks haul the river’s waste once in six months or so,” said Manoj Bhattacharya, an assistant priest. “Some effluents are pushed to the banks instead of being transported to a landfill or waste treatment facility.”Though heavy metals, electroplates, dyes and electronic waste have been found in the river through studies by scientists and environmental watchdogs, industries have washed their hands of the problem.“We don’t dispose industrial waste and have our own sewage treatment plant,” said Sankarapandian Sankaravelayutham, a senior deputy general manager at Amco Batteries Ltd., one of the oldest factories in the region.“The government should encourage rainwater harvesting and not give approval to builders who fail to come up with sewage treatment plans for their constructions.”The deputy general manager of Karnataka Vidyuth Karkhane Ltd., a manufacturer of electrical transformers, pins the blame on chemical, plastic and textile industries.“We outsource our waste to a scrap transport corporation, so we have nothing to do with the river’s pollution,” said MV Srinivasaiah. “The effluents may be from chemical and textile industries.”Government agencies have also been shortsighted about their sewage treatment plans since they haven’t kept up with the city’s growth and population.Tushar Giri Nath, the chairman of Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board, said the development of the city has shrunk the watershed area, so every section of the society needs to be held accountable.“We are setting up nine new plants to treat sewage, but the industries must have their own effluent treatment plants,” said Nath. “The pollution control board should monitor the quality of water and residents must be more conscious.”A servitor prepares to use a newly installed water purification machine at Gali Anjaneya Swami Temple in Bangalore, India. RNS photo by Priyadarshini SenThree years ago, the priests took matters in their hands, installing the purifier that now filters water from a well dredged within the temple’s precincts. Last month, they replaced it with a high-end machine that distills up to 1,000 liters a day.“This came as a psychological balm for us,” said Manjunatha, an official at a health insurance company in Bangalore. “More devotees will flock to the temple knowing that Lord Hanuman has finally blessed us with clean water.”Armed with filtered water, the priests go about their daily rituals. They bless worshippers, pour libations on the deity, chant mantras and prepare consecrated food.The devotees wash their feet in clean water and then circle the temple in clockwise manner holding flowers, basil leaves and knotted betel leaf garlands. On reaching the altar, they bow their heads low as priests sprinkle filtered water over their heads.“We are still not sure of the water quality, but we believe in god. Industrialists and politicians have exploited our river because they are faithless people,” said Bhavna, an engineering student whose forefathers also worshipped at the temple.Having done what they can, Gali Anjaneya Swami temple priests idealize a time when the Hanuman deity was in a forested area before urban settlements came up.“We may never get our river back, but at least the powers above are protecting us from contaminated water,” said Sudarshana. “Our faith has grown stronger.” Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email News By: Priyadarshini Sen Photos of the Week August 30, 2019 Share This! Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 Share This! Share This! By: Priyadarshini Sen Priyadarshini Sen,Load Comments,Texas imam ordered to pay $2.55 million in sexual misconduct case TagsBangalore faith and environment Hindu temples Hinduism homepage featured India sacred river technology,You may also like Catholicism Priyadarshini Senlast_img read more

Trial Begins For Firefighters Pushing For Equal Pay

first_imgThe Houston Professional Fire Fighter’s Association wanted to put pay parity on the November ballot, but thousands of signatures were not validated in time by the City of Houston.A trial begins today for a lawsuit seeking a court order to force the City of Houston to count the pay parity petitions, so the measure can be eligible for the next ballot.Marty Lancton is president of the Houston Professional Firefighters Association.“This is a fundamental right of the citizens to petition their government. When government doesn’t recognize that, becomes a huge issue,” Lancton told News 88.7.According to the Houston Chronicle, the City Secretary counts the petitions in the order they are submitted unless the law dictates otherwise. Sharelast_img