September 28 2005 On Sunday October 2 2005

first_imgSeptember 28, 2005 On Sunday, October 2, 2005 at 3 pm Sonya Kumiko Lee will play works by Bach, Beethoven, Ginastera , Tchaikovsky and Chopin to celebrate the 24th annual Colly Concert at the Colly Soleri Music Center Amphitheater. This concert honors the memory of Cosanti Foundation Co-Founder Colly Woods Soleri who with Paolo Soleri founded the Cosanti Foundation. Colly was an avid supporter of art and cultural events during her lifetime and the tradition has continued through the Colly Soleri Music Center’s Concert Season which continues to bring excellent music to the high desert. Concert-goers may choose to follow a complimentary one hour tour at 11, 12, 1 or 2 and enjoy a gourmet luncheon between noon and 2 pm consisting of Roasted Red Pepper and Coconut Soup, Mixed Green Salad with Sweet Pecans, Blue Cheese, Pears and Arcosanti Peach Vinaigrette Dressing, Butternut Squash with Orange Cranberry Glaze, Broccoli Rabe with Roasted Garlic, Portobello Pizzas with Fresh Tomatoes and Goat Cheese, Flank steak on Greens with Mango and Pepper Sauces and Hazelnut Custard with Chocolate. Tickets are $30.00 for Luncheon and Concert , $15.00 for Concert Only, $7.50 Student Concert Only. Reservations are required. [Photo: Sonya-Kumiko Lee & text: Cosanti Foundation]last_img read more

The BBCs rollout of updates to its iPlayer catch

first_imgThe BBC’s rollout of updates to its iPlayer catch-up TV service has continued with the launch of a new version of the kids version of the service, CBBC iPlayer, on computers, tablets and mobile phones.The homepages of CBBC iPlayer now include an image-led “curated experience”, showcasing key programmes, seasons, events and themes. The service also now features a restart feature for simulcast streams allowing users to rewind through the last two hours of the programming schedule.Children’s iPlayer is also now available for the first time on smartphones and tablets, seen as key devices for the target audience.The Children’s iPlayer websites are built using the same components and technology as the main version of iPlayer and is based on responsive design, enabling it to be adapted for different screens.The BBC has emphasised the care it has take to ensure a safe environment for kids. In a blog posting, Graham Matthews, business analyst, BBC iPlayer said: “The driving principle behind this is to try to deliver the most appropriate experience for all users of the websites. In Children’s iPlayer we have different navigation for CBBC and CBeebies which highlights the relevant programmes and schedules for these channels. This also separates the children’s content from the rest of the programmes in the main version of iPlayer, which may feature content that is inappropriate for young children. We have also scoped search results and recommendations so that only CBBC and CBeebies programmes are returned.”Matthews said the BBC had also taken care to ensure that links from the site have been considered for appropriateness, and social sharing tools on the playback page are not displayed to children. Links to the main iPlayer are accompanied by pop-ups informating users they leaving the children’s area.The BBC will roll out a Cbeebies iPlayer for younger kids in the weeks to come.last_img read more

Want to reduce your risk of dementia in older age

first_imgWant to reduce your risk of dementia in older age? Move as much as you can.We’ve all heard about techniques to get us more physically active — take the stairs, park the car a bit further from your destination, get up and march in place for a minute or two when standing or sitting at a desk.Now a study finds even simple housework like cooking or cleaning may make a difference in brain health in our 70s and 80s.”Exercise is an inexpensive way to improve health and our study shows it may have a protective effect on the brain,” says Dr. Aron S. Buchman with Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, who led the study.Previous research found just 45 minutes of walking three days a week actually increased brain volume among individuals 65 and older.The new study, published Wednesday in the online issue of Neurology, is unique because Buchman was able to analyze the actual brains of study participants. The findings are a “great thank you” to the participants who agreed to donate their brains for research after death, he says.The study looked at 454 older adults who were 70 or older when the research began. Of those adults, 191 had behavioral signs of dementia and 263 did not. All were given thinking and memory tests every year for 20 years.In the last years of research before death, each participant wore an activity monitor called an accelerometer, similar to a Fitbit, which measured physical activity around the clock — everything from small movements such as walking around the house to more vigorous movements like exercise routines. Researchers collected and evaluated 10 days of movement data for each participant and calculated an average daily activity score.The findings show that higher levels of daily movement were linked to better thinking and memory skills, as measured by the yearly cognitive tests. And when Buchman analyzed brain tissue under a microscope, this finding turned out to be the case even for individuals with at least three signs of Alzheimer’s disease, such as amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Even though these individuals might have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, 30 percent of them had “normal” cognition at death, says Buchman.Why one person shows signs of dementia and another, who has similar degenerative changes in the brain, does not, is a mystery. But Buchman says the new findings suggest that physical activity may be protective, even amidst developing Alzheimer’s. It sort of masks the symptoms, he says, and is an “empowering finding” suggesting you can have some control over your brain health even if you don’t have control over developing Alzheimer’s.”It’s almost as if the physical activity was helping the brain to bypass the physical damage,” says Dr. Tim Church, a preventive medicine specialist with Pennington Biomedical Research Center at Louisiana State University who was not involved in the research. “It appears that physical activity was critical to creating a reserve that protects against those physical damages.”And, while intense activity and exercise is highly beneficial, even light activity can make a difference, says Buchman. “As long as you have some activity and you’re moving, whether you’re chopping onions, typing, sweeping the floor or even running,” you can reduce your risk of cognitive decline.The findings are impressive, says research scientist Carl Cotman, director of the Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia at the University of California, Irvine, showing that physical activity may “offset the ill effects of brain degeneration.” He adds that lifestyle interventions such as an increase in physical activity and movement can be powerful even in the presence of disease. Cotman was not involved in the research.But exactly how the protective effect may work is unclear. Buchman says the current findings are a “great start” but he hopes to look more closely at participant’s brains to measure different proteins and try to identify which ones might link physical activity to better cognition.There are some caveats to the study. The findings do not show clear cause and effect. Study participants with dementia had significantly lower indications of movement compared to those without dementia. It may be possible that as people lose memory and thinking skills, they also reduce their physical activity.And the study did not have data on how active participants were over the course of their lives. It could be that older adults who moved more were also lifelong exercisers so it’s not known if physical activity in early life may have played a role.While previous research suggests that people may be able to beat back dementia with exercise, Buchman acknowledges that “more studies are needed to determine if moving more is truly beneficial to the brain.” Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

WeWork Sues ExEmployee for Disclosing Information to Reporters

first_img WeWork Companies Inc., a closely held operator of shared office space, has sued a former employee for unauthorized disclosure of information to Bloomberg News that showed the firm, which is valued at $16 billion, falling short of its financial goals.In a complaint filed late on Friday with the New York Supreme Court for Manhattan, WeWork accused Joanna Strange, who was fired June 10, of unlawful access to its computers and of stealing confidential and proprietary information. The firm, which operates sites in 40 U.S. and foreign cities, also accused Strange of breaching her contractual and fiduciary duties.Bloomberg reported on Friday that in late April, WeWork in an internal review document slashed a 2016 profit forecast by 78 percent, cut its revenue estimate by 14 percent and disclosed a 63 percent surge in projected negative cash flow.Chief Executive Officer and co-founder Adam Neumann told employees in meetings on May 9 and May 23 that the company had to rein in costs and get its finances in order, according to Bloomberg. WeWork said on Thursday that it reported a case of corporate theft to the U.S. Attorney’s office and that the “stolen document was prepared months ago for scenario planning purposes and does not reflect our robust operating momentum.”Reuters was unable to contact a lawyer for Strange.WeWork said it required all employees to sign an agreement that precluded them from disclosing proprietary information without written approval. This restriction applied both during and after Strange’s employment, the court filing said.After her termination, Strange accessed WeWork’s computers without authorization by using credentials belonging to David Fano, a senior executive, and disclosed the information to reporters, the filing said.WeWork said it was seeking unspecified damages and a trial by jury.Strange may say that at least some of the disclosed information was not truly proprietary, said Dan Eaton, a lecturer at San Diego State University’s College of Business and an employment lawyer. Some information about the company’s finances was known, he said.Strange may say that she had authorized access to the information, Eaton said. In California, granting access to and then misusing information is not a violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act because the anti-hacking statue focuses on access, not misuse, he said.(Reporting by Herbert Lash; Editing by Lisa Von Ahn) WeWork Image credit: Mandel Ngan | Getty Images July 18, 2016 The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List –shares Add to Queuecenter_img WeWork Sues Ex-Employee for Disclosing Information to Reporters Reuters Next Article 2 min read This story originally appeared on Reuters Apply Now »last_img read more

NexTech And LivePerson To Demo Conversational Commerce Platform Integrating AR With Messaging

first_imgNexTech And LivePerson To Demo Conversational Commerce Platform Integrating AR With Messaging On Main Stage at AWE USA Conference May 31, 2019 PRNewswireMay 30, 2019, 6:03 pmMay 30, 2019 Augmented RealityAugmented World ExpoEvan GappelbergMarketing TechnologyNewsNexTech AR Solutions Previous ArticleMatcha Announces Content-Powered Popups to Help Ecommerce Websites Capture More LeadsNext ArticleSeal Software Announces Version 7 of Award-Winning AI-based Contract Analytics Platform Company to Present a New Use Case for Sentiment Analysis Capabilities Within Its AR E-commerce Platform, Featuring Conversational Commerce TechnologyNexTech AR Solutions announced that CEO Evan Gappelberg and President Paul Duffy will team up with LivePerson to showcase its sentiment analysis capabilities for augmented reality (AR) eCommerce at the Augmented World Expo (AWE) USA Conference, taking place in the heart of Silicon Valley May 29-31, 2019 at the Santa Clara Conference Center in Santa Clara, CA. On the Mission City Main Stage, May 31 at 1:30 pm PT, NexTech and LivePerson will demonstrate a new and powerful retail use case for AR sentiment analysis by integrating NexTech’s web-based AR into LivePerson’s conversational commerce platform. During the demonstration, several pairs of Tamara Mellon shoes (co-founder of Jimmy Choo) will be shown as AR objects.“The benefits of having an augmented reality view and one-touch purchase transaction without having to leave the native messaging application makes the eCommerce interaction super simple and seamless for consumers and changes the retail landscape forever,” comments Scott Starr, LivePerson AVP Retail. “Conversational Commerce leverages humans, artificial intelligence and now AR to deliver more personalized shopping experiences for consumers in the messaging channels they use each day.”“We are very excited and fortunate to be partnering with LivePerson and Tamara Mellon, two leaders and visionaries in their respective fields,” comments Evan Gappelberg, CEO of NexTech. “The ability to demonstrate how commerce can be transformed and disrupted using LivePerson’s conversational messaging and NexTech’s augmented reality features at AWE is giant step forward for NexTech as well as the emerging AR industry as a whole.”Marketing Technology News: Seven Tech Data Executives Named 2019 CRN “Women of the Channel”“With the integration of NexTech’s AR with Chat and LivePerson’s conversational commerce platform and sentiment analysis – both with natural language and computer vision – we’re creating a new transformative technology for retailers to convert shoppers into buyers, reduce returns and build brand loyalty by measuring customer responses to products in real-time,” said Paul Duffy, NexTech president. “This is a one-of-a-kind technology, unique to both the retail and AR industries. By tapping into sentiment analysis, brands are no longer confined to a binary model of analytics, but rather can utilize a full spectrum of sentiment in order to deliver targeted AR experiences and drive traffic to their online stores.”AWE USA is an annual augmented and virtual reality conference and expo attended by creators, investors, developers and product leaders representing some of the most innovative companies working in the AR/VR sector. 2019 marks the 10th annual conference. With 7,000 attendees, 250 exhibitors, 300 speakers seen on over 100,000 sq. ft. of expo space, “AWE is the CES of the future, the very near future,” says USA Today. Some of the featured brands attending will be Amazon, Facebook, Google, Disney, GE, Walmart, Qualcomm, and Oculus.Marketing Technology News: True Influence Hires Data Strategist and Marketing Technology Visionary Ray Estevez as Chief Data OfficerNexTech has built its AR and AI eCommerce platform as an affordable, scalable, customizable, and most importantly, easy solution to integrate within an existing web interface, making NexTech one of the leaders in the rapidly growing AR industry, estimated to hit $120 billion by 2022, according to Statista.Gartner reports 100 million consumers will shop in augmented reality online and in-store by 2020. NexTech is building out its AR and AI eCommerce offerings, which include using AI to create a guided and knowledgeable curator that can be programmed to be used for eCommerce, retail and education.Marketing Technology News: DataRobot and Informatica Partner to Accelerate Adoption of AI Across the Enterpriselast_img read more

Study Temperaturerelated mortality decreasing in Spain over the past four decades

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 24 2019Temperature-related mortality has been decreasing in Spain over the past four decades, according to a new study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a research center supported by “la Caixa”. The study analyzed the Spanish population’s vulnerability to hot and cold temperatures in the context of global warming.The study, published in The Lancet Planetary Health, analyzed temperatures and deaths related to cardiovascular diseases recorded in 48 Spanish provinces between 1980 and 2016. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in Spain and there is clear evidence of an association between temperature and cardiovascular mortality.The findings show that temperature-related cardiovascular disease mortality was 38.2% lower in the period between 2002 and 2016 than for the period between 1980 and 1994. Analysis of the data in 15-year periods revealed that temperature-related cardiovascular mortality decreased at a rate of more than 17% per decade.Specifically, heat-related cardiovascular mortality for the period 2002-2016 was more than 42% lower in men and more than 36% lower in women than in 1980-1994, while cold-related mortality was 30% lower in women and nearly 45% lower in men.Notable differences were observed between the sexes: heat-related mortality was much higher in women, while men were more vulnerable to cold temperatures. In older people, the risk of death attributable to high temperatures was significantly higher for both sexes, but in the case of cold the increase was significant only for men.”We observed two parallel phenomena,” explained Hicham Achebak, a researcher at ISGlobal and the Centre for Demographic Studies (CED) and lead author of the study. “First, over the past four decades the mean temperature has risen by nearly 1°C. The trend is towards fewer days of moderate or extreme cold temperatures and more days of high temperatures. Second, the Spanish population has adapted to both cold and warm temperatures. The number of deaths at a given temperature is lower now than it was four decades ago.”Related StoriesSP Scientific introduces new system for controlled rate freezing of biological materialsStudy finds increase in fatal opioid overdoses after cold weatherCardiac arrest survivor meets four Good Samaritans who saved his life one year after recoveryThe adaptation observed appears to be due to socioeconomic development and structural improvements–including improvements in housing conditions and health care systems. The authors highlighted a number of socioeconomic developments in Spain, including increases between 1991 and 2009 in per capita income (€8,700 to €22,880) and per capita health care spending (€605 to €2,182). In addition, between 1991 and 2011, the proportion of households with central heating went from 25.8% to 56.9% while the proportion of households with air conditioning rose from 4.16% in 1991 to 35.5% in 2008. Source:Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)Journal reference:Achebak, H. et al. (2019) Trends in temperature-related age-specific and sex-specific mortality from cardiovascular diseases in Spain: a national time-series analysis. The Lancet Planetary Health. doi.org/10.1016/S2542-5196(19)30090-7. The Spanish population has demonstrated a considerable capacity to adapt to rising temperatures. However, as this has not necessarily been the result of a strategy to mitigate the consequences of climate change, it is possible that this adaptive response is limited and will not be sustained at higher temperatures, as climate warming accelerates.”Joan Ballester, ISGlobal Researcher and Coordinator of the Studylast_img read more

Aussie military says tracking app doesnt breach security

Australia’s military said on Tuesday that a fitness tracking application did not breach security despite revelations that an interactive, online map using its data can show troop locations around the world. In this March 1, 2017, file photo, Fitbit’s new Alta HR device is displayed in New York. The Pentagon is doing a broad review of how military forces use exercise trackers and other wearable electronic devices in the wake of revelations that an interactive, online map can pinpoint troop locations, bases and other sensitive areas around the world. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The Pentagon announced this week that it was doing a broad review of how the U.S. military forces use exercise trackers and other wearable electronic devices after the revelations about GPS tracking company Strava’s application. Strava’s online Global Heat Map shows the locations of its users.Australian Defense Industry Minister Christopher Pyne said the Defense Department was preparing a report for the government on the matter. A department statement said it was aware of the possible risks of the collection of location data through personal electronic devices and apps.”The circumstances of this application do not constitute a security breach,” the statement said.The issue was first publicized last weekend when Nathan Ruser, a 20-year-old student who is studying international security with a double major in Middle Eastern studies at Australian National University in Canberra, tweeted that “U.S. bases are clearly identifiable and mappable.” It was later reported by The Washington Post.The map uses satellite information to show the locations of subscribers to Strava’s fitness service. The map shows activity from 2015 through September 2017.Heavily populated areas are well lit, but warzones such as Iraq and Syria show scattered pockets of activity that could be caused by military or government personnel using fitness trackers as they move around. Those electronic signals could potentially identify military bases or other secure locations.”Who knows if someone from any of the intelligence services noticed it before, but as far as I know, I’m the first person in public to put two and two together,” Ruser told The Associated Press from Thailand, where he is visiting family.He said more people were interested in the issue than he expected.”I expected it to hang around pretty quietly in some of the open-source analyst circles, intelligence wonks would look at it and then for the government or the company to quietly fix the security vulnerabilities, but it’s got pretty big,” he added.He called the map a “wakeup call.””I wouldn’t say it provides an acute security risk to any personnel because a lot of those bases are known and even though this map gives you a huge advantage if you were to prioritize targeting the base, none of America’s current adversaries like ISIS can walk up to one of those bases and bomb it,” he said.Ruser said he had not been contacted by Strava or any security agency since his tweet attracted attention. Citation: Aussie military says tracking app doesn’t breach security (2018, January 30) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-aussie-military-tracking-app-doesnt.html © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Pentagon probes fitness-app use after map shows sensitive sites (Update) Explore further read more

Is the energystoring solar cell soon to be reality

first_img Provided by University of Erlangen-Nuremberg Electricity from a renewable energy source such as the sun or wind is only available when the wind blows or the sun shines, and it is extremely difficult to store any surplus electricity. New concepts are required—and researchers from the Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy at FAU are counting on chemical concepts for storing energy.In two joint projects, the scientists are exploring new ideas for using molecules to store solar energy and are investigating molecules and processes that allow energy to be stored efficiently and released in a controlled manner when required. It is even conceivable that stored chemical energy could be converted directly into electrical energy.The research is based on the so-called norbornadiene-quadricyclane storage system. Norbornadiene (NBD) and quadricyclane (QC) are hydrocarbons and have been under discussion among experts as potential candidates for storing solar energy for some time now. Under the influence of light, a reaction within the norbornadiene molecule is triggered, causing the molecule to transform into quadricyclane. The reaction produces an energy density similar to that of a high-performance battery. Thanks to this property, quadricyclane is also known as “solar fuel.”The sub-project focusing on photochemical and magnetochemical storage and the release of solar energy in strained organic compounds is led by Prof. Dr. Dirk Guldi and Prof. Dr. Andreas Hirsch. The scientists are working on producing various new groups of NBD and QC derivatives. In addition, they are systematically investigating the influence of photosensitizers and electron acceptors as well as solvents and magnetic fields within this process. The long-term goal of the researchers is to create a closed system-fuel cycle for molecular storage systems.Prof. Dr. Julien Bachmann, Prof. Dr. Jörg Libuda and Dr. Christian Papp are working together in the sub-project focussing on catalytic and electro-chemical release of solar energy stored in strained organic compounds. The scientists are developing new catalyst systems and electrodes that can be used to convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy. They intend proving the concept behind the functional principle using hybrid boundary surfaces with a suitable electronic structure, chemical structure and electrochemical stability.The results of both sub-projects could form the basis for building an energy-storing solar cell. The electricity created by solar energy could be stored intelligently and used highly efficiently thanks to intramolecular reactions. Credit: CC0 Public Domain Liquid storage of solar energy – more effective than ever before Storing solar energy is the central challenge facing energy researchers. Alongside traditional solutions such as solar cells or batteries, creative chemical concepts for storing energy are paving the way for entirely new opportunities. Intramolecular reactions are making it possible to transform solar energy and store it in a singular molecule. This may form the basis for constructing energy-storing solar cells.center_img Citation: Is the energy-storing solar cell soon to be reality? (2018, June 15) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-energy-storing-solar-cell-reality.html Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Hacky hack hack Australia teen breaches Apples secure network

first_imgPolice reportedly raided the boy’s home last year and found hacking files and instructions saved in a folder called ‘hacky hack hack’ Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A schoolboy who “dreamed” of working for Apple hacked the firm’s computer systems, Australian media has reported, although the tech giant said Friday no customer data was compromised. © 2018 AFPcenter_img Apple fined millions for Australia false iPhone claims The Children’s Court of Victoria was told the teenager broke into Apple’s mainframe—a large, powerful data processing system—from his home in the suburbs of Melbourne and downloaded 90GB of secure files, The Age reported late Thursday.The boy, then aged 16, accessed the system multiple times over a year as he was a fan of Apple and had “dreamed of” working for the US firm, the newspaper said, citing his lawyer.Apple said in a statement Friday that its teams “discovered the unauthorised access, contained it, and reported the incident to law enforcement”.The firm, which earlier this month became the first private-sector company to surpass US$1 trillion in market value, said it wanted “to assure our customers that at no point during this incident was their personal data compromised”.An international investigation was launched after the discovery involving the FBI and the Australian Federal Police, The Age reported.The federal police said it could not comment on the case as it is still before the court. The Age said police raided the boy’s home last year and found hacking files and instructions saved in a folder called “hacky hack hack”.”Two Apple laptops were seized and the serial numbers matched the serial numbers of the devices which accessed the internal systems,” a prosecutor was reported as saying. A mobile phone and hard drive were also seized whose IP address matched those detected in the breaches, he added.The teen has pleaded guilty and the case is due to return to court for his sentencing next month. Citation: ‘Hacky hack hack’: Australia teen breaches Apple’s secure network (2018, August 17) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-hacky-hack-australia-teen-breaches.htmllast_img read more