Revealed: The finalists of the Donegal Local Enterprise Awards

first_imgThe sixteen finalists have been announced for the 2019 Donegal Local Enterprise Awards.Businesses from across Donegal will compete for the highly-coveted prizes in the finals the business awards, which will be held in the Radisson Blu Hotel, Letterkenny, on the 6th of December.The finalists are: Siobhan Boyle of Sculpt CosmeticsMark Bolton of Bolt OnSara and Philip Moss of Filligan’s LtdCathal Sheridan of Huku BalanceJames Coyle of JC EngineeringConor McLaughlin, McMorrow & McLaughlin SolicitorsHugh Wilhare, Mulroy Bay MusselsPat Lafferty, Multi-Crete Agri ProductsDerek Walker, Nat NootAndrew McElhinney, O’Donnell’s BakeryAndrea Kelly, On the Go Coffee CoCiara Shine, Shine’s SeafoodEileen Rafferty, The BothyLynn Costello Erskine, The Pear in PaperKieran Murray & Conor McGrath of Thinstone Donegal Jessica Peoples of Zona DanceThe 16 finalists for the 2019 Local Enterprise Awards were selected following a rigorous screening process of the many applicants.“The awards have been running for over 20 years in Donegal and we have a stringent process in place to make the short-list, never mind be named as a finalist,” said Head of Enterprise in Donegal, Michael Tunney.He added that the 16 businesses in the final can all be justifiably proud of reaching this stage. “Having come through the screening process, the next stage will see the finalists go before the judges on December 5th and the category winners will be announced after that. There will be €10,000 up for grabs across the categories, all that remains now is to see who will win the awards,” Mr Tunney added. Awards will be presented for Best Established Business (over 18 months trading) with a runner-up in that category as well.There will also be a winner and runner-up in the Best Start Up Award, while awards will also be presented for Best Donegal Export Enterprise, Best Donegal Enterprise Innovation and also for Food Coast and Creative Coast categories.“As a county our economy is dominated by small and micro businesses. These awards help to highlight the contribution of these businesses to the economy of Donegal and the important role they play in providing employment and contributing to the sustainability of their local communities,” the Head of Enterprise added.The Donegal Business Awards are also part of the National Enterprise Awards, with one of the 16 finalists set to get an opportunity to represent Donegal on the national stage next year and Donegal’s overall winner last year, Martin McGuinness, went on to win a Regional Enterprise Award.Local Enterprise Office Donegal is supported through co-funding from the Irish Government and the European Regional Development Fund 2014 – 2020. Revealed: The finalists of the Donegal Local Enterprise Awards was last modified: November 27th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

10 months agoGattuso happy with AC Milan victory over SPAL

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Gattuso happy with AC Milan victory over SPALby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAC Milan coach Rino Gattuso was happy with victory over SPAL.Andrea Petagna had given SPAL the lead at San Siro, but Samu Castillejo and Higuain turned it around, plus a last-gasp Gianluigi Donnarumma save on Mohamed Fares for the 2-1 result.“I liked the team performance a great deal, both technically and tactically. I liked the mentality of the side, that knew how to suffer,” Gattuso told DAZN.“We could’ve killed it off earlier and must continue to improve. We’ve had to deal with all sorts of things this year. Now we go to Doha without Suso for the Italian Super Cup, one of our most important players, but I don’t want any alibis.“We had two big games in December that we didn’t make the most of, but we’ve just got to lick our wounds and keep going.” last_img read more

10 months agoSouthampton boss Hasenhuttl ready to sell in January

first_imgSouthampton boss Hasenhuttl ready to sell in Januaryby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveSouthampton boss Ralph Hasenhuttl is ready to sell in January.With the January transfer window set to open next week, Hasenhuttl will have his first opportunity to make a mark on his squad.The 51-year-old, who remained tight lipped about possible departures, was unconcerned about upsetting first-team players.“It’s not about being happy, it’s about being successful. At the moment the only goal is to be successful,” he said.“I can’t take a view of the future of every player.“For me it’s important to build something up and to bring the squad back in a successful period.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

a month agoMan Utd hero O’Shea says Solskjaer the right man in charge

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man Utd hero O’Shea says Solskjaer the right man in chargeby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Manchester United defender John O’Shea says Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is the right man in charge.United have lost two of their opening six Premier League matches and are now preparing for the visit of Arsenal on Monday. “The club has spoken recently about sticking behind Ole and having a plan in place,” O’Shea told Sky Sports.”It’s going to take time but Ole and the staff will know that they are going to need to get results along the way. They cannot let performances drop too low. They have to maintain standards.”Everyone at the club has to look in the mirror and ask whether they are doing the best for the players and the coaching staff.”It’s a work in progress. The success is not there on the pitch at the moment so people are naturally looking more at the off-the-field issues. The people in power must want the best for the club and it will hurt them looking across the city at what other teams close by are doing.”They need to have trust in the people they have put in place. It can turn around quite quickly if you get things right in the transfer windows.” last_img read more

8 days ago​Man Utd blocked Mourinho from signing Boateng for bargain price

first_img​Man Utd blocked Mourinho from signing Boateng for bargain priceby Ansser Sadiq8 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United did not allow then boss Jose Mourinho to sign Jerome Boateng from Bayern Munich.Mourinho was desperate for an experienced centre-half in what would end up being his final summer window at the club.Boateng was among the names discussed near the end of that transfer window, but United blocked any deal.The Athletic reveals that United looked at software that assessed Boateng’s game and showed a decline in performances, along with significant injury problems.It meant that a possible £13.1 million transfer was axed.The data showed that Boateng was not fit enough to perform at his best level for the full 90 minutes, as he was making fewer tackles and running significantly less in the latter parts of games. TagsTransfersAbout the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Video: Watch Las Vegas Go Crazy When VCU Hits Meaningless Layup vs. Ohio State To Cover Point Spread

first_imgFans in Las Vegas go nuts with VCU backdoor cover vs. Ohio State.VCU lost its Second Round NCAA Tournament game against Ohio State Thursday afternoon, 75-72, in overtime.Those who bet on the Rams were victorious, though, as the Buckeyes were 3.5-point favorites. That betting victory came at the buzzer, as VCU’s Jonathan Williams made a meaningless layup as time expired that meant everything to the point spread. Check out the reaction at the Las Vegas SportsBook and Planet Hollywood when Williams made the layup. There were a lot of happy people in that room. VCU covers the spread & the crowd at @LVSuperBook Westgate Theater goes wild. #OhioState #VCUrams pic.twitter.com/zCcUVpWvnE— Tommy Lorenzo (@sportsbooktom) March 19, 2015Sometimes in #Vegas it’s not about who wins, it’s about by how much. Reaction to a last second layup, to lose by 3. pic.twitter.com/lDKgSlEbJZ— Planet Hollywood (@phvegas) March 19, 2015Perhaps VCU can take some solace in the fact that they covered the point spread. Ohio State is set to face Arizona on Saturday at 5:15 p.m. E.T. The game will be televised on CBS. (The Wildcats are favored by eight.)last_img read more

Middleclass gang violence in BC breaks from history with higher stakes

first_imgVANCOUVER — Police officer Keiron McConnell had been on the job four months when a call crackled over the radio about a stolen vehicle.The driver was arrested after a short chase, but when McConnell was told the young man was a gang member, it shattered his understanding of what that meant.“Everything I thought about gangs up to this point had kind of come from the movies ‘Colors,’ ‘Boyz n the Hood,’ that kind of stuff,” McConnell said.“This young fellow lived on the west side of Vancouver, mom and dad still lived in the house, they were wealthy by 1990s standards, his siblings were successful in school. So it was like, what is it about this kid that got him involved?”The question plagued McConnell as he watched the pattern of seemingly privileged, middle-class young men choosing a life of crime repeat itself.About 15 years after that arrest, he explored the question of what makes British Columbia’s landscape so unlike any other through a PhD.Established wisdom, he found, aligned with the stereotypes he’d carried into the job. Traditional gang members in cities like Chicago are young men born into poor neighbourhoods without any options — a rational response to irrational circumstances.That’s not always the case in British Columbia.“In B.C., gangs are, generally speaking, an irrational response to rational circumstances,” he said.An evolving gang landscapeGangs in B.C. are not a new phenomenon.The outlaw McLean gang was executed in a group hanging in 1881 after terrorizing the Kamloops community and killing a police officer. Newspapers in the 1940s documented clashes in Vancouver between military personnel and flamboyantly dressed zoot suitors on Granville Street. And the aptly-named “park gangs” staked territorial claims to the city’s parks in the 1960s and 1970s.The notorious Hells Angels opened their first B.C. chapter in 1983 and would come to dominate organized crime across Canada by around 2000. Police consider the outlaw motorcycle gang a “top-echelon” criminal organization like the Mafia, operating in more than 20 countries.Others like the United Nations, Red Scorpions and Brothers Keepers have emerged at the mid-level and the province’s anti-gang agency says much of that structure remains in place today.“The main conflicts are still there, however, you see now the gangs are more loosely tied,” said Sgt. Brenda Winpenny, spokeswoman for the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit, the provincial anti-gang agency.Also distinctive today is how quickly allegiances shift and the number of lower-level “cells” or unnamed subgroups emerging, she said.It makes defining and quantifying the number of gangs difficult. The number of gangs controlling criminal markets listed by the anti-gang agency grew from a handful in 1980 to 188 by 2011, but there’s no available estimate today.The Criminal Code defines a gang as a group of three or more people with the main purpose of committing or facilitating serious offences for financial benefit. But many so-called “gangsters” don’t identify with the word.“A lot of these kids, they’re not seeing themselves joining the gang,” McConnell said.If you’re selling illicit drugs though, you’re associated, he said.“You’re not independent, or if you are, you’re not independent for very long. You have to get the drugs from somebody and the drugs are coming in from organized crime and filtering down to mid-level and low-level street gangs.”In contrast to the military-like hierarchy of the Hells Angels, McConnell likened the structure of many gangs today to a “bag of marbles.” They are not tied to particular geographic areas but move location and shift loyalty according to business opportunity.And with that has come more public violence.When Canada’s homicide rate reached 660 in 2017 —the highest in almost a decade — Statistics Canada attributed part of the spike to gang-related violence and shootings, singling out British Columbia as a hot spot. The province saw the homicide rate rise by 32 per cent that year.The homicide rate in B.C. levelled off again in 2018 but gang-related violence continues to represent 37 per cent of all killings in the province.“In the, quote, ‘good old days,’ when the Hells Angels were in control of the whole lot, those acts of violence were minimal because they would go and talk to people about behaviour and about expectations and about attitudes, and if you did not listen carefully there were consequences,” said Rob Gordon, a criminologist at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, B.C.“There’s no subtlety anymore. I’m being a sentimentalist.”Violent new stakesJoe Calendino was lying on a prison floor, emaciated and sick from drug withdrawal symptoms when he says he hit rock bottom.He was a member of the Hells Angels’ infamous Nomads chapter when he was busted selling $10 worth of crack cocaine to an undercover cop.It was the moment he began turning his life around, which he says was possible because the outlaw motorcycle club was ready to cut him loose.But the gang landscape has shifted so dramatically in the 10 years since then that today’s youth won’t have the same second chance, Calendino said.“There’s no rock bottom anymore, it’s a grave,” he said.Calendino now works with youth in gang prevention and intervention through his non-profit Yo Bro Yo Girl Youth Initiative. The organization offers programming in classrooms, after school and during school breaks that aim to keep kids busy, active and empowered with support from positive role models to choose a healthier life path.When he looks back on his early entry into criminal life, beginning with drugs in Grade 8 and high school fights with other kids, he said the stakes were different than those facing the kids today.“We didn’t go around shooting each other. We got into fights, a man or boy got beat up and it was over, it was done. You may have fought someone 10 to 15 times but you never ever thought of picking up a gun and going to shoot him,” he said.Vancouver Police Chief Adam Palmer told reporters in January 2018 that the region was experiencing a swell of gang-related violence unparalleled in the past 10 years after an innocent 15-year-old was killed by a stray bullet while his family was driving past a shootout.Several groups are at odds over drugs and killing one another, Palmer said.For McConnell, today’s middle-class gangsters aren’t too different from the young man from west Vancouver he arrested in the 1990s.Two years ago, he was speaking with a “wealthy” father of two young men at risk of violence.“I pleaded with him to use his wealth to get his kids out of the country and he didn’t. And his one son was shot and killed in Surrey and at the same time, his other son was shot five times.”‘Easy money’Officials say many of the middle-class young men stepping off school and career paths to pursue criminal businesses see it as a legitimate career opportunity.They begin working low level “dial-a-dope” lines, where users can order drugs by phone for delivery or meet up, with the promise of growth.“It’s the pizza delivery service of drug dealing,” Winpenny said, adding that it’s also the riskiest position in the line because it means dealing directly with addicts and acting as an easy target for rival gangs.“These young kids are being recruited into this promise of making some easy money,” she said. “But the higher ups are sort of insulating themselves from that violence.”It’s the entry point into a much more complex organizational structure. A 2018 report by an anti-gang task force in the Vancouver suburb of Surrey found many gangsters are profit driven and operate enterprises similar to traditional businesses. Gangs in B.C. are more sophisticated than in other parts of Canada and some even require new members to pay for training, it says.Their product, primarily, is drugs.Historically, British Columbia’s “porous” ports, with no dedicated patrolling force, made it an attractive hub for the international trade, Gordon said. And its temperate climate allowed it to become a major producer of marijuana, for which a thriving black market persists despite legalization last October. Newer products — the deadly opioid fentanyl and its analogues — now present an even more lucrative business opportunity. The extremely concentrated painkillers are cheap to produce in China and even easier to transport than other drugs, since they can be ordered on the dark web and sent by regular mail.Chief Const. Mike Serr of the Abbotsford Police Department, who also chairs the drug advisory committee for the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, said in May that quantifying the profitability of opioids is difficult since they are typically cut with other drugs rather than sold “pure.”For comparison, he said one kilogram of pure heroin typically costs $70,000 and would be added to a cutting agent to produce two kilograms worth of drugs for street sales.One kilogram of fentanyl costs roughly $12,500 but can be mixed with 100 kilograms of a cutting agent for street sale because it’s so potent. Estimating that profit is difficult because it may be sold under several different drug names with different concentrations, and in much smaller quantities than one kilogram at a time, but $1 million isn’t out of the ball park, he said.When you consider analogues like carfentanil are significantly more concentrated than fentanyl, the profit margins are exponential.“If someone said 10 years ago, can you make the perfect drug, carfentanil and fentanyl would be, unfortunately, the drug because it’s cheap, it’s much easier to import, it’s easier to source,” he said. Amy Smart and Laura Kane, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

September 28 2005 On Sunday October 2 2005

first_imgSeptember 28, 2005 On Sunday, October 2, 2005 at 3 pm Sonya Kumiko Lee will play works by Bach, Beethoven, Ginastera , Tchaikovsky and Chopin to celebrate the 24th annual Colly Concert at the Colly Soleri Music Center Amphitheater. This concert honors the memory of Cosanti Foundation Co-Founder Colly Woods Soleri who with Paolo Soleri founded the Cosanti Foundation. Colly was an avid supporter of art and cultural events during her lifetime and the tradition has continued through the Colly Soleri Music Center’s Concert Season which continues to bring excellent music to the high desert. Concert-goers may choose to follow a complimentary one hour tour at 11, 12, 1 or 2 and enjoy a gourmet luncheon between noon and 2 pm consisting of Roasted Red Pepper and Coconut Soup, Mixed Green Salad with Sweet Pecans, Blue Cheese, Pears and Arcosanti Peach Vinaigrette Dressing, Butternut Squash with Orange Cranberry Glaze, Broccoli Rabe with Roasted Garlic, Portobello Pizzas with Fresh Tomatoes and Goat Cheese, Flank steak on Greens with Mango and Pepper Sauces and Hazelnut Custard with Chocolate. Tickets are $30.00 for Luncheon and Concert , $15.00 for Concert Only, $7.50 Student Concert Only. Reservations are required. [Photo: Sonya-Kumiko Lee & text: Cosanti Foundation]last_img read more

The BBCs rollout of updates to its iPlayer catch

first_imgThe BBC’s rollout of updates to its iPlayer catch-up TV service has continued with the launch of a new version of the kids version of the service, CBBC iPlayer, on computers, tablets and mobile phones.The homepages of CBBC iPlayer now include an image-led “curated experience”, showcasing key programmes, seasons, events and themes. The service also now features a restart feature for simulcast streams allowing users to rewind through the last two hours of the programming schedule.Children’s iPlayer is also now available for the first time on smartphones and tablets, seen as key devices for the target audience.The Children’s iPlayer websites are built using the same components and technology as the main version of iPlayer and is based on responsive design, enabling it to be adapted for different screens.The BBC has emphasised the care it has take to ensure a safe environment for kids. In a blog posting, Graham Matthews, business analyst, BBC iPlayer said: “The driving principle behind this is to try to deliver the most appropriate experience for all users of the websites. In Children’s iPlayer we have different navigation for CBBC and CBeebies which highlights the relevant programmes and schedules for these channels. This also separates the children’s content from the rest of the programmes in the main version of iPlayer, which may feature content that is inappropriate for young children. We have also scoped search results and recommendations so that only CBBC and CBeebies programmes are returned.”Matthews said the BBC had also taken care to ensure that links from the site have been considered for appropriateness, and social sharing tools on the playback page are not displayed to children. Links to the main iPlayer are accompanied by pop-ups informating users they leaving the children’s area.The BBC will roll out a Cbeebies iPlayer for younger kids in the weeks to come.last_img read more