Vote-counting continues, but Republicans likely to maintain control of Senate

first_imgIn Georgia, Rev. Raphael Warnock is headed to a January 5, 2021, runoff with Sen. Kelly Loeffler. Sen. David Perdue is currently just over 50% in the other Senate race in that state, but with the remaining votes to be counted in that race, it’s possible that Perdue will also be headed to a runoff against Jon Ossoff. In one possible scenario, those two runoffs could end up determining control of the Senate.Democrat Cal Cunningham narrowly trails Sen. Thom Tillis in North Carolina, but it’s unlikely that the remaining ballots there will push him over the top.The odious Lindsey Graham and Joni Ernst will stay in the Senate. – Advertisement – Once again, the Democrats in the Senate will represent more people than the Republicans in the Senate. But once again, the Republicans are strongly favored to have control of the Senate, highlighting again how undemocratic the U.S. system is and how badly we need major reform. Sen. Susan Collins leads Sara Gideon narrowly in Maine. If Collins remains under 50% of the vote, the 4% of the vote currently going to a third-party candidate will be reallocated and could help Gideon. That’s two big ifs adding up to a very long shot, though. In Michigan, Republican challenger John James narrowly leads Democratic Sen. Gary Peters, but there’s reason to hope that the same mail ballots expected to boost Biden will also boost Peters.- Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement –last_img read more

New Study: How Fear Drives People to Choose Death

first_imgCBN News 10 June 2017Family First Comment: Polls that support euthanasia are based on ‘intolerable pain’ but as this research – one of many – shows, that’s not the motivating factor for wanting assisted suicide…“Those who received (assisted suicide) tended to be white and relatively affluent and indicated that loss of autonomy was the primary reason for their request,” the report states. “Other common reasons included the wish to avoid burdening others or losing dignity and the intolerability of not being able to enjoy one’s life. Few patients cited inadequate control of pain or other symptoms.”www.rejectassistedsuicide.org.nzPatients who choose euthanasia are most often motivated by the fear of losing control or being a burden to others, not pain, according to a new study.The Toronto-based study published in the New England Journal of Medicine comes after Canada legalized euthanasia last summer. Since then, hundreds have reportedly opted for Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID).The study analyzed patients from four hospitals participating in MAID and concluded fear of losing control is a leading factor when people want to die.“Those who received MAID tended to be white and relatively affluent and indicated that loss of autonomy was the primary reason for their request,” the report states. “Other common reasons included the wish to avoid burdening others or losing dignity and the intolerability of not being able to enjoy one’s life. Few patients cited inadequate control of pain or other symptoms.”Researcher Madeline Li told The Washington Post that the results of the study shocked her.“They are mostly educated and affluent—people who are used to being successful and in control of their lives, and it’s how they want their death to be,” Li said. She used the example of a patient who was once a marathon runner before being bedridden from cancer. “That was not how she saw her identity,” Li said.READ MORE: http://www1.cbn.com/cbnnews/health/2017/june/how-fear-drives-people-to-choose-deathIt’s not pain but ‘existential distress’ that leads people to assisted suicide, study suggestsWashington Post 26 May 2017A few decades ago, doctor-assisted suicide was considered a fringe idea despite surveys showing many physicians supported the idea under certain circumstances. The face of euthanasia at that time was Jack Kevorkian, a Michigan pathologist nicknamed “Dr. Death.” By his own admission, he helped 130 people end their lives. He was convicted of homicide and served eight years in prison.While doctor-assisted suicide remains a polarizing issue, some countries and states have begun to accept it. Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg and Switzerland have legalized voluntary euthanasia. In 2016, Canada legalized “medically assisted death.” Australia, France, South Africa and the United Kingdom are considering similar measures.In the United States in 2014, the story of Brittany Maynard — a 29-year-old California woman with a brain tumor who wanted to end her life but had to travel to Oregon to do so — led to an outpouring of support and sympathy on social media. Six states, including California, now allow some form of medical aid in dying.Allowing assisted dying to come into the open has helped us gain insights about one of the most fundamental questions of our existence: Where do humans draw the line between choosing life and choosing death?But a study released Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests the answers may be surprising: The reasons patients gave for wanting to end their lives had more to do with psychological suffering than physical suffering.READ MORE: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2017/05/24/its-not-pain-but-existential-distress-that-leads-people-to-assisted-suicide-study-suggests/?utm_term=.4a1e5b3dea2alast_img read more