Bloggers Tweeters React to Portfolios Closure

first_imgFor nearly two years I’ve been covering the media industry’s bad news on this blog, including some that’s hit very close to home. Now it hits closer still.Hamilton Nolan, via Gawker:Condé Nast, Manhattan’s most lavish magazine publisher, was once able to subsidize expensive and monumental magazine launches with newspaper profits. But now the last of its kind, Portfolio, is dead.BusinessWeek’s Jon Fine:The shuttering of Portfolio, among other cutbacks at Condé Nast, means that not even a magazine company well-known for keeping struggling titles alive (generally for reasons that are more personally-driven than market-driven) can elude current media realities.Group president David Carey, via AP:Our timing proved to be terrible in terms of building a big ad franchise from scratch. We saw where we are and where we want to be in 18 months. The gap between those two points was becoming bigger.Tina Brown, via the Daily Beast:This is terrible news. It’s not just that the cratering ad market has claimed another victim. Condé Nast chairman Si Newhouse had been admirably supportive of Portfolio for the last two years. The fact that he elected to close it, as suddenly as he folded Domino, Men’s Vogue, and the men’s fashion trade mag DNR suggests a worrying element of panic engulfing the steadfast publisher I worked for so comfortably for 17 years at Tatler, Vanity Fair, and The New Yorker.BW editor John Byrne’s “tweet”:Did Condé Nast overspend on Portfolio? The cost of launching its website alone exceeded most mag launches.David Wilson, via FOLIO:’s Facebook page:This may have been most expensive magazine ever launched. They basically spent a year and over $100 million launching it as I recall. It was in the same space as my last magazine edtitorial gig (a mixture of business, finance and lifestyle) … only on a much, much grander scale. I hate to say it, but it was predictable. They spent way too much money vs. potential revenues. The business and financial audience are not in-depth readers. They have ADD personalities, and are addicted to their Blackberry’s and iPhones.Portfolio publisher William Li, via the Observer:Portfolio changed business journalism. The whole idea of writing breathlessly glowing profiles of CEO, we didn’t play that game … I’m proud of the fact that in our first year we won a National Magazine award. Business Week and Fortune? Please, that never happened. We were just nominated for two Webbys!James Ledbetter, via Slate’s Big Money blog:Last fall, I was on panel with a Portfolio writer who made a cutting remark about the vulnerability, in the age of Wall Street’s evaporation, of new business publications such as the one you’re reading. I challenged him to a bet: I’d wager $100 that [the Big Money] would outlast the print version of Portfolio. He declined to take the bet, which tells you just about everything you need to know about the sad, incredibly expensive history of that magazine: Even the people who continued to work there didn’t, in recent months, think it could last.Daniel Gross, via Newsweek:Portfolio seemed to operate on the presumption that the application of capital and the hiring of boldface names could instantly establish a thriving media brand in a crowded and fractured marketplace.Via comments on FOLIOmag.com’s story:It came up fast and it ended fast. Business information is really covered well on the Internet, so it’s a bit understandable that a print information source would not be valuable unless it was unique. If the big, established titles are struggling, it should have been a warning sign to Condé. Just do what it takes to keep Vanity Fair going … It seemed a lot like Vanity Fair, which I already read, but with a biz bent. If VF cranked up the coverage in that direction by even a feature every other month, I’d feel like I have my serving of Portfolio too.A $100 million to launch it? Condé Nast had more money than sense. Let’s get some perspective here. Portfolio launched at a time when “sub-prime,” “bailout” and “recession” didn’t appear in the first 100 words of every business article. It presented a different voice in business coverage along the lines of Vanity Fair, albeit without the cloying bits of high-society hipness and Graydon Carter’s unbridled hatred of George W. It’s a sad irony that Portfolio left us with one of the most-entertaining and precise sagas of the Wall Street crash with Michael Lewis’ “The End.”I am a one-man army at our little magazine, pulling in small but healthy ad numbers but still tickin’ because, I believe, that we have the freedom of shifting gears faster than monolithic organizations. Condé Nast is just too big. Love Vanity Fair, but wonder who reads it all?I have to admit I will miss Portfolio. As a subscriber since issue #1, I felt it elevated the otherwise dry genre of business reporting to something that bordered on what one might call “sexy.” I could never quite get comfortable with the positioning of Portfolio. It was stuck between trying to be a business magazine and a fashion/lifestyle magazine and never made it to either. Condé Nast announced this morning that it will shutter Portfolio, the troubled business magazine that it spent more than $100 million to launch. News of the closing first appeared on Wall Street Journal blogger Peter Kaftka’s Twitter feed, and was quickly confirmed by Jeff Bercovici, Portfolio’s own blogger.Below, a sample of reactions from the blogosphere, Twitter and the Web:Bercovici:last_img read more

LIVE MUSIC in Wilmington Week of April 29 2018

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Here are a few opportunities to catch live music in Wilmington this week:Larry GilbertTuesday, May 1, 6pmThursday, May 3, 6pmRocco’s Restaurant & Bar193 Main Street, WilmingtonPianist Ricky LauriaThursday, May 3, 8pmTremezzo2 Lowell Street, WilmingtonKaraoke with Winnell EntertainmentFriday, May 4, 8pmPacific Grove211 Lowell Street, WilmingtonLori & Richard Ruggerio (Husband & Wife Vocalist Duo)Saturday, May 5, 2:30pmWindsor Place of Wilmington92 West Street, WilmingtonNOTE: Know of any other musical performances happening in town this week or in the coming weeks? Let me know at wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedLIVE MUSIC in Wilmington (Week of May 13, 2018)In “Business”LIVE MUSIC in Wilmington (Week of May 27, 2018)In “Business”LIVE MUSIC in Wilmington (Week of March 25, 2018)In “Business”last_img read more

Vladimir Putins secret gymnast lover gives birth to twins in Moscow VIP

first_imgRussia’s President Vladimir PutinLUDOVIC MARIN/AFP/Getty ImagesAlina Kabaeva, the 36-year-old ex-gymnast who is the secret lover of Russian president Vladimir Putin has given birth to twins, reports coming out of Moscow revealed. Even though there is no official confirmation from Kremlin or Kabaeva regarding the relationship, many believe that the Olympic gold medallist has long been associated with the Russian president.Sergei Kanev, an investigative journalist close to the Russian intelligence services revealed that the entire VIP fourth floor at the Kulakov Research Centre for Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Perinatology was completely cleared earlier this month before admitting Kabaeva for delivery. Kanev claims that Federal Protective Officers conducted a thorough check in every corner of the maternity hospital before Kabaeva’s arrival.”Half of the medical team was kicked out of the delivery ward. A famous doctor from Italy was the key to helping the birth with the assistance of academician Gennady Sukhikh, director of the medical center. The mother was delivered of two boys. However, a C-section had to be performed,” said Kanev, the Sun reports.However, Kanev did not name the Italian doctor who reached Russia for Kabaeva’s delivery.It should be noted that Vladimir Putin was married to Lyudmila Shkrebneva, and the couple has two daughters, 34-year-old Maria, and 32-year-old Yekaterina. The couple who got married in 1983 parted ways in 2014, thus ending 31 years of togetherness.It was after his divorce that Kabaeva’s name started popping up with the president. Interestingly, Kabaeva appeared several times in front of the public with a seemingly wedding ring on her fingers, and this made many people believe that Putin has secretly married her.There are also claims that the couple had already given birth to their first son in 2015 from a Swiss Clinic. Several reports also allege that Kabaeva has a fleet of jets for her service, and she also enjoys top-category security with the protection of armed soldiers.last_img read more

Bangladesh cant bear burden of Rohingyas for long Khaleda

first_imgBNP chairperson and former prime minister Khaleda Zia holds a Rohingya child in her arms while visiting Rohingya camp in Balukhali of Ukhia, Cox’s Bazar. Photo: BNP Bangladesh Nationalist Party chairperson Khaleda Zia on Monday urged the government and international community to intensify diplomatic efforts to resolve the Rohingya crisis, reports UNB.She made the call while talking to newsmen after distributing relief materials among displaced Rohingyas at Moynargona Rohingya camp in Ukhiya.The BNP chief also urged Myanmar to take back its nationals ensuring their security and citizenship for the sake of humanity.”We think the Rohingya crisis won’t be resolved only by distributing relief materials. The Rohingyas will have to be repatriated through discussions and strong diplomatic efforts so that they can live their own country with security and without fear,” she said.Mentioning that the government could not yet take any effective step to resolve the Rohingya problem, Khaleda said, “The Bangladesh government must strengthen its diplomatic efforts to send back the Rohingyas. Alongside, the international organisations will have to take responsibility for repatriating them on humanitarian ground.”The BNP chief called upon the international community to come forward to ensure the safe return of Rohingyas to their own country. “I appeal to the international organizations: You please translate your words into actions to overcome the problem.”Khaleda said the international community should understand Bangladesh is a poor, small and densely populated country. “Though we’re poor, we have got the big heart and we love people. That’s way locals are making their best efforts and providing money from their pockets to ease the pains and sufferings of the Rohingyas.She further said, “But it’s not possible for us to bear it for a long time. So, Myanmar should take steps to take their citizens back to their country as early as possible as winter is approaching fast as the rainy season is over.”Khaleda Zia arrived at Ukhia around 1:00pm to visit four Rohingya camps and a medical camp set up by pro-BNP physicians’ body, Doctors’ Association of Bangladesh (DAB). She will return to Chittagong later in the evening.last_img read more

Newlywed housewife beaten dead

first_imgProthom Alo IllustrationA newlywed housewife was beaten to death allegedly by her in-laws over family feud at Deogaon village in Sadar upazila early Thursday.The deceased was Sushila Rani, 20, wife of Bipul Chandra of the village.Victim’s family said Sushila was married to Bipul barely two and a half months ago and since then, Bipul had been torturing her as she protested against his alleged extramarital affairs and drug addiction.Victim’s sister said the body of Sushila was found in a toilet of Bipul’s house in the morning. The body was bleeding and it bore multiple injury marks on her check, throat and forehead, she claimed.Officer-in-charge of Sadar police station Mostafizur Rahman said the body was sent to Sadar Hospital for autopsy.The reason behind the death will be cleared after getting the post-mortem report, he said.last_img read more

Boxers Have Dr Banks in Their Corner

first_imgGreg Banks, M.D. always has been passionate about boxing and mixed martial arts. But being a doctor is what forced him into a corner … literally. An intimate knowledge of the dangers of ring competition, as both participant and spectator, inspired the family and urgent-care physician to moonlight as a guardian of these combatants.Greg Banks moonlights as a ringside doctor in Richmond Va. (Courtesy photo)Banks has been a Washington, D.C.-area ringside doctor at boxing and MMA events for a decade. He is driven by his love of these sports and his commitment to help people.“I would see these guys ringside in a corner and wonder: ‘Who’s that with a stethoscope?’”That curiosity ultimately led Banks to secure his license through the Association of Ringside Physicians. He soon became that guy ringside, with the stethoscope.“It’s a very significant job because of the physical nature of the sports,” said Dr. Gregory Pleasants, who has served for 15 years as a Richmond, Va.-based ringside doctor. “I have worked some fights with Greg, and he has a real passion for the sports to go with his passion for service.”“For me,” said Banks, 52, “as someone who loves the sports and studied taekwondo, too, it’s a great opportunity to have a great seat to see the matches. Most important, though, it’s very dangerous to compete in these sports, and the ringside doctors are there to help minimize injury — especially brain injury.”The native Washingtonian and Howard University College of Medicine graduate said his job is both entertaining and gratifying.“The doctor is mostly in the shadows — until something happens,” he said. “It’s scary sometimes. But, most of the time, the injuries are cuts or maybe a broken bone, sprains. When I’m not worried about the fighter, I’m actually having a great time because I have the best seat in the house.”But Banks said there are many factors in boxers or MMA fighters who suffer serious brain damage — and it’s not just because of hard punches. Participants often undergo dramatic weight loss just before fights to meet weight requirements. Banks explained that quickly losing and regaining weight can spell trouble.“Dehydration comes with weight-cutting,” Banks said. “Their whole goal is to come into the fight as big and strong as possible, to inflict as much pain as possible. But with weight-cutting, you lose weight all over.“In the brain, there is something called CSF [cerebrospinal fluid] that helps cushion the brain. But when you’re dehydrated, there is less of that cushion, that fluid. Quick weight gain won’t allow you to function at your premium and you won’t be as protected. So, your brain can get hit with the first blow and then bounce off the other side of the skull. So that’s a double concussion that can cause tearing of the blood vessels in the brain, causing bleeding, which is never good.“It’s a big science. [Doctors are] looking at it each year: ‘What can we do to prevent [traumatic brain injuries] from happening?’ One thing we’re looking at is dates, so boxers have a deadline to make the weight that’s not so close to the fight, giving the body enough time to replace that fluid.”Banks said that doctors continue to seek ways to detect performance-enhancing drugs. They contribute to severe injuries because they “allow guys to train longer, get more muscle mass on their bodies and withstand more injuries. And they are able to inflict more injuries on their opponents because their strength is off the scales.”Banks started his medical journey as a teenager. He hoped to become a marine scientist. But when that discipline bored him, Banks’ physician father asked him several questions and then said: “You want to help people? Then maybe you should be a doctor.”“Then he walked away,” Banks said. “No pressure.”But the idea took root. At age 18, he began the trek that led him to his family-medicine practice in Front Royal, Va. His service as a ringside doctor has been just as rewarding.“Back in the day, getting your residency was like going through war,” he said. “And with that, you got something engrained in your character: Everyone’s a patient. When you see someone who looks like they are about to get into trouble, that stuff from my training kicks in. … And trouble is where the ringside physician steps in. No. 1, above all, is to protect the fighter. That’s more of a thrill than watching the fights.last_img read more

Quantum levitation could prevent nano systems from crashing together

first_img(Phys.org) — Since the first demonstration of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) in the mid-‘80s, the technology has not proven as useful as originally anticipated. One of the problems is that the tiny components tend to stick together due to strong surface adhesion forces on the nanoscale, an effect that engineers call “stiction.” Now in a new study, scientists suggest that this problem might be solved by inducing quantum levitation between components, which they demonstrate by simply adding a thin metallic coating to one of the interacting surfaces. Journal information: Applied Physics Letters Explore further Researchers see exotic force for first time More information: Mathias Boström, et al. “Ultrathin metallic coatings can induce quantum levitation between nanosurfaces.” Applied Physics Letters 100, 253104 (2012). DOI: 10.1063/1.4729822 By preventing stiction, quantum levitation may offer a way to prevent surfaces used in MEMS and nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) from crashing together due to other attractive van der Waals forces that exist between them. Since the thickness of the nanocoating changes the dielectric properties of the interacting surfaces, researchers would have to precisely determine the correct thickness for a desired levitation distance. If the technique works, it may provide a much needed revitalization of the fields of MEMS and NEMS.In the future, the researchers plan to extend their investigations to other materials, such as zinc oxide and hafnia, which are widely used in microelectrical and microoptical devices. They also have an upcoming paper (arxiv.org/abs/1206.4852v1) in which they investigate the repulsive and attractive forces between excited Cesium atoms that are confined in a nanochannel, which are very different from those in free space.“Two Cesium atoms that are close together and in an excited state can form unusually large molecules when they are between two gold surfaces,” explained coauthor Mathias Bostrom of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway, and Australian National University in Canberra, Australia. “The effects from retardation for these excited state interactions between atoms are very similar to what we found for the Casimir-Lifshitz force between a gold-coated silica surface and a silica surface in toluene. Hence we found long-range attraction that brings the atoms together and short-range repulsion enabling bound states (preventing the atoms from crashing together, i.e., forming super large molecules).”Finally, the researchers plan to further investigate how quantum levitation may be used for NEMS systems by looking at anisotropic effects, which are the different properties that arise when parallel or perpendicular to the material interface.“Our colleagues in Oslo (Professor Clas Persson of the University of Oslo and his team) have calculated the actual optical properties of the materials (the dielectric function) for thin gold sheets which will be used to investigate how anisotropic effects may influence NEMS systems with gold nanocoatings. It is likely that the range with repulsive forces (preventing the system from crashing together) may be influenced in such improved calculations. Our aim is to do such calculations this autumn.” Two pieces of silica – one with a gold nanocoating – will experience a repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz interaction beyond a critical distance. Without the gold nanocoating, the interaction would be attractive at the same distance. Image credit: Boström, et al. ©2012 American Institute of Physics The team of researchers, from institutions in Norway, Australia, and Sweden, has published the study on quantum levitation between nanosurfaces in a recent issue of Applied Physics Letters.The odd thing about this levitation is that it stems from the Casimir-Lifshitz force, which has the unusual property of being either attractive or repulsive. As a type of van der Waals force, it arises between nearby particles due to their inherent electrical properties. In this study, the scientists looked at the Casimir-Lifshitz force that occurs between two silica surfaces in a liquid (either bromobenzene or toluene). Normally, this force is attractive, but it weakens as the silica particles move further apart. This weakening is called retardation, and the researchers found that they could decrease the distance at which retardation occurs by coating an ultrathin layer of gold on one of the silica surfaces. This small modification shifts the retardation regime from a separation distance of several nanometers down to a few nanometers by modifying the dielectric properties of the coated silica surface. In fact, retardation weakens the attraction so much that the force becomes repulsive when the surfaces are separated by a few nanometers or more, at a critical distance called the levitation distance. Below the levitation distance, the force again becomes attractive, while above this distance it becomes increasingly repulsive up to a maximum point. At still larger distances, the repulsion stabilizes below the maximum value. The ability to control the Casimir-Lifshitz force is not completely new. Scientists have known about these effects theoretically since the 1970s, but only recent advances in nanotechnology have allowed for experimental investigations. “The interaction between two silica objects in toluene is attractive,” coauthor Bo Sernelius of Linköping University in Sweden told Phys.org. “Previous studies have shown that, if one of the objects is replaced by a solid gold object, the interaction turns repulsive for distances beyond the levitation distance. Thus there is a potential barrier that reduces the chance for the objects to come close and stick to each other. We found, and this is new, that if instead of having a solid gold object we had a silica object with a thin gold coating, the levitation distance shrunk and the barrier became higher. The chance of preventing stiction increased considerably.” Copyright 2012 Phys.org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Quantum levitation could prevent nano systems from crashing together (2012, July 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-07-quantum-levitation-nano.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more