Parchment expects fireworks at trials – Olympic silver medallist expects fiercely competitive 110m hurdless

first_imgDOHA, Qatar: Hansle Parchment believes the track and field world could be in for something special at Jamaica’s Olympics trials next month, as he expects fierce competition in the men’s 110m hurdles. The 24-year-old, who won bronze in the event at the 2012 Olympics followed by silver at the World Championships last year, is expecting fierce competition from the likes of Omar McLeod and Andrew Riley. McLeod burst on to the scene last year with some impressive times, before finishing sixth at the World Championships. The 21-year-old McLeod has gotten off to an even faster start this year, winning the World Indoor title followed by a new personal best clocking of 9.99 in the 100m. Fans will not have to wait long to see McLeod and Parchment match strides, as both men are scheduled to face the starter in tomorrow’s opening meet of the 2016 IAAF Diamond League series in Doha, Qatar. But it is next month’s clash that Parchment is really looking forward to, that’s the one which really matters. “Trials coming up is a stepping stone going forward into the Olympics and I am definitely looking forward to the competition,” Parchment said. “As we know we have some good guys coming up; Omar (McLeod) is there and (Andrew) Riley, just to name a few. “So it should be very interesting competition in Jamaica. I hope that we can turn a few heads when we compete at the trials.” Parchment is hoping with the emergence of such top level competition in Jamaica, hurdles will captivate the attention of local track and field fans and get the respect it deserves. “I have always said that hurdling is one of the better events, but just like some of the field events there is not so much attention given to it,” Parchment said. “People don’t really know who is hurdling, who is throwing or who is jumping most of the times, so we want to compete in such a way that people can see what’s happening in the hurdles. We want to raise the level of competition, so that people start talking about hurdling as one of the events to see.” With competition increasing in the event yearly, Parchment anticipates that youngsters will also start gravitating to the discipline more. As it relates to his chances at this year’s Olympics, Parchment is optimistic that once he stays healthy and focus he will do very well. “There has been one small setback, but other than that it has been a good season so far, especially in background training. I have done a lot more than I usually do, so I think I am on a good path,” Parchment said. “So once I keep working and keep the focus I know I will be good for the rest of the season.”ryon.jones@gleanerjm.comlast_img read more

California Tech Money Headed To Houston For Cancer Immunotherapy Research

first_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: WikipediaKatie Couric interviews cancer immunotherapy scientists who will join the $250 million, nationwide research collaboration. From left: Carl June, University of Pennsylvania; Jim Allison of MD Anderson; Antoni Ribas, UCLA; Lewis Lanier, UCSF, Crystal Mackall, Stanford Medicine; Jedd Wolchok, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.The Silicon Valley entrepreneur Sean Parker, who helped start Napster and Facebook, is pouring $250 million dollars into immunotherapy research for cancer. Researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center, along with researchers at five other cancers centers in the U.S., will take part in the partnership.The focus of The Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy in San Francisco are techniques that prod the body’s own immune system to attack cancer.One example is the breakthrough melanoma drug Yervoy. Dr. Jim Allison, now at MD Anderson, developed Yervoy after learning how to unleash the power of the immune cells called T-cells.Parker recognizes that immunotherapy is at a critical tipping point, and needs support to continue basic research that won’t turn a profit right away, Allison said. “Sean has a passion for immunotherapy and I think he sees it as really novel, and a whole different way of looking at things,” Allison said, speaking by phone from Los Angeles before the announcement ceremony.Immunotherapy research operated at the margins of cancer science for decades, but after the launch of Yervoy in 2011, followed by similar drugs, the field attracted immense attention and is now hailed for its innovations.“He respects that, he’s been sort of a disruptor himself over the years, with Napster and Facebook and stuff like that,” Allison said.Six cancer centers will participate in the partnership, sharing research money and also scientific results.“What we’ve learned at MD Anderson in the last couple of years is you really have to look inside the tumor and see what’s going on if you if you want to know why therapies are working and not working,” Allison said.Allison says researchers at MD Anderson are already doing that type of analysis, using a mass cytometry machine they purchased with money from the Parker Foundation. The half-million dollar instrument can analyze tumor tissue and identify 40 different characteristics, such as the presence or absence of certain proteins inside or outside a malignant cell.Allison will co-direct the Parker-backed efforts at MD Anderson, along with Dr. Padmanee Sharma, a specialist in genitourinary cancers and immunology research.“I think it’s wonderful,” Sharma said. “I think finally immunotherapy will have the resources it needs, that we can develop combination strategies and research some of the strategies that are currently not working for all tumor types.”The other centers in the partnership are Stanford, UCLA, UC San Francisco, the University of Pennsylvania and Memorial Sloan Kettering in New York.The Parker Institute aims to unify “research programs, intellectual property licensing, data collection, and clinical trials across multiple centers under the umbrella of a single non-profit biomedical research organization,” according to a press release. Listen 00:00 /00:26 X Sharelast_img read more