Game of Thrones season 8 opening credits hint at events to come

first_img Tags More on Game of Thrones Watch Game of Thrones season 8 episode 2 trailer now Game of Thrones season 8 premiere leaked on DirecTV Now Game of Thrones season 8 episode 1: The 6 funniest lines Speaking of the Wall…Once the credits move to the gigantic map, they begin at the Wall, which now has a huge chunk missing, thanks to you-know-who.Last Hearth, we hardly knew yeThe credits now move on to a new location. Last Hearth is the ancestral home of House Umber, and if you watched the premiere, you know what happens there. Note the icy tiles representing the White Walkers reaching out to it, showing the path of the dead as they march. Also note the spiral pattern that plays out in a gruesome scene from the episode.Winterfell is comingNext, the camera shoots to Winterfell, the Starks’ beloved home. Winterfell has always been in the credits, but not like this. Here the camera swoops through the godswood and then dives inside the castle itself. It races through the Stark crypt, where there’s a statue of Lyanna Stark, among others. Her life, and the son she delivered before dying, is only going to keep returning as a plot point here. And there are plenty of rumors that the crypt will figure heavily in this season’s episodes. Could the dead be resurrected? It’s been known to happen.King of the hillKing’s Landing is next, the capital of the Seven Kingdoms, home of the Iron Throne and the Red Keep. Look for Qyburn’s scorpion and dragon skulls from past historical battles. Just a reminder that no one is bowing down to the terrifying dragons without a fight. And there’s the Iron Throne, which really doesn’t look worth all this blood and death. The Lannister lion is shown above it now, but maybe not for long.More to comeThe credits aren’t going to be stagnant, so stay alert for clues in future weeks.”I’ll say that there are differences (in the credits) in every single episode,” art director Kirk Shintani told BuzzFeed. “From episode to episode, pay attention, because there’s lots of hints scattered around.” 57 Photos Now that the final season premiere of Game of Thrones has aired, it’s time to roll things back and take a dragon’s-eye view of those new opening credits. (Spoilers ahead.)The credits have always been complex and rewarded repeat and close viewings. The elaborate opening spins through the map of Westeros and changes from week to week. But they’re even fresher this season, as the creative team that designed the credits wanted a whole new chance to remake them.”We wanted to explore the idea that there was more under the surface than previous seasons,” creative director Angus Wall told BuzzFeed in an interview published Sunday. “And that there was an interior and a depth in terms of the layers beneath the surface that we had only hinted at before.”Astrolabe newnessThe credits begin inside of an elaborate astronomical instrument called an astrolabe. If you’re quick on the pause button, you can see it’s covered with murals depicting past plotlines that shaped the story, from the Red Wedding to the birth of Daenerys’ dragons to the fall of the Wall. Look for the Red Comet, an omen of major events, such as the dragons’ return. Share your voicecenter_img Game of Thrones Post a comment Game of Thrones stars, from season 1 through today TV and Movies 0last_img read more

2020 Land Rover Discovery Sport updated with mild hybrid powertrain more incar

first_img reading • 2020 Land Rover Discovery Sport updated with mild hybrid powertrain, more in-car tech 2019 Land Rover Range Rover P400e review: A hard hybrid to recommend Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it More about 2015 Land Rover Discovery Sport AWD 4dr SE Preview • 2018 Range Rover Velar: Effortless SUV elegance on- and off-road Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Land Rover Apple SUVs Tags See All Post a commentcenter_img 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Evoque review: Style, now with more substance Apple Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors More From Roadshow Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 Disco never died, it just hid out until Land Rover sought to bring it, and the Disco Sport, back to life. Now, a couple of years later, the latter is staring down some quality upgrades for the 2020 model year.Land Rover on Tuesday unveiled the 2020 Discovery Sport. On the spectrum of refreshes, this one is right about in the middle, making some slight visual changes while also updating the more important underlying bits. Two new powertrains have been introduced: One is a 246-horsepower I4 from the modular Ingenium engine family, while the other one slaps a 48-volt mild hybrid system into the equation, boosting its output to 286 horsepower.That new mild hybrid system comes alongside a new underlying platform. Now riding on Land Rover’s Premium Transverse Architecture platform, not only does it allow the Discovery Sport to pick up this kind of electrification, it makes the body some 13 percent stiffer. It’s also quieter, thanks to some improved sound deadening measures.As for style, it’s a little different, but not too much. The front and rear bumpers are new, and to my eyes, a little sportier-lookin’ than before. The grille is different, but I didn’t notice that until I read it in the press release. There are also some new LED lights to further differentiate the refreshed Disco Sport from its forebear.Enlarge ImageIt might take a keen eye to find the differences, but on the whole, they make for a more premium-looking SUV. Land Rover Inside, the center console has been redesigned, eschewing the rotary dial in favor of the sticklike gear lever seen on other Jaguar Land Rover vehicles. This rejiggering also makes enough space for wireless device charging, a first for the Disco Sport. Six USB ports are scattered throughout, as well. A new rearview mirror can display what the rearview camera sees, while additional cameras beneath the front end allow off-roaders to see “through” the hood on the infotainment display.The interior is further gussied up with more premium materials, including a new optional non-leather seat material made from recycled polyester microfiber. You can even spec massaging seats, if you feel like really going for broke. Behind the first row, there are new cup holders and redesigned storage spaces, in addition to extra seat configurability, bringing the total number of available seat configurations to 24.On the infotainment front, the Discovery Sport now rocks Land Rover’s InControl Touch Pro system, with its 10-inch touchscreen replacing the outgoing setup. It’s not Touch Pro Duo, though — the climate controls aren’t relegated to their own screen. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are available, as is a 4G Wi-Fi hotspot. Safety systems are available, but not standard, and they include adaptive cruise control, automatic emergency braking and lane-keep assist.The 2020 Land Rover Discovery Sport hits dealerships in the summer, and pricing will be announced closer to the car’s on-sale date.Originally posted May 21.Update, June 10: Reduced mild hybrid output by 10 horsepower due to an error in Land Rover’s press release. Share your voice 0 Land Rover •last_img read more

Rajshahi quarantined day before opposition rally

first_imgThe bus service with Rajshahi from 12 districts including Dhaka, Pabna, Natore was halted for almost 12 hours on Thursday without any prior announcement, subjecting commuters to tremendous trouble throughout day. Photo: Prothom AloThe major opposition and Jatiya Oikya Front ally Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) alleged that bus service from 12 districts with Rajshahi was halted in order to obstruct the Oikya Front’s rally scheduled on Friday.Jatiya Oikya Front (National Unity Front) is to hold a public rally at around 2:00pm at the Madrasa grounds in Rajshahi.The bus service with Rajshahi from 12 districts including Dhaka, Pabna, Natore was halted for almost 12 hours on Thursday without any prior announcement, subjecting commuters to tremendous trouble throughout day.Members of Natore Bus Owners Association and Rajshahi Transport Workers Union have given contradictory statements in this connection.Earlier on Tuesday, the Oikya Front organised a rally in Suhrawardy Udyan in the capital. A number of vehicles were prevented from entering Dhaka for ‘security reasons’ on the day.Passengers and vehicles drivers complained that they had to face interminable traffic congestion due to the police checks along the way. Also, bus movement was closed at one stage on the Dhaka-Chittagong Highway in the Signboard area at the time.Earlier, BNP chairperson’s adviser Mizanur Rahman Minu talked to the media in a press conference at Rajshahi BNP’s office at noon on Thursday.“We got written permission for the rally on 12 conditions just 14 hours before the due date. Bus service was halted to hamper the gathering,” Minu told the media.Alleging that the police have been arresting BNP leaders and activists ahead of the rally, the adviser to the BNP chairperson said, “Police raided the houses of hundreds of BNP leaders and activists. Some over enthusiastic and ambitious police officers are creating obstacles before the rally in many ways.”In response to BNP’s allegations, Rajshahi metropolitan police spokesman Ifte Khair Alam said, the police were performing their regular duties and were not creating any obstacle. There was no incident of politically motivated arrests.Natore Bus Owners’ Association general secretary Sajidul Islam told Prothom Alo that they received a letter from the transport workers union saying a bus driver of Desh Travels was assaulted on Wednesday and they would close the bus service until legal action was taken.However, when the Prothom Alo correspondent contacted Desh Travels counter officials, they said that they did not know of any such incident of a driver being assaulted.Meanwhile, several bus drivers told Prothom Alo that they started out with passengers from Rangpur in the morning. After reaching Bogura, the owners and workers blocked their buses.A transport owner of Bogura said on condition of anonymity that police and Awami League-backed transport owners had restricted them to drive to Rajshahi.Bogura highway police denied such allegations.On the other hand, the convener of Rajshahi District Motor Workers Union Kamal Hossain said, the bus service was halted due to the dispute between the two Bus Owners’ Association of Rajshahi and Natore.last_img read more

Haiti PM resigns after deadly unrest

first_imgDemonstrators march along a street during a protest in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on 14 July 2018. Photo: ReutersEmbattled Haiti prime minister Jack Guy Lafontant resigned on Saturday following deadly violence and looting sparked by a now-abandoned plan to raise fuel prices.”I submitted my resignation to the president of the republic,” who has “accepted my resignation,” Lafontant said in the lower house of Haiti’s legislature.Lafontant had faced a potential vote of no confidence had he not resigned — something he had previously insisted he would not do.Last week, the government in the impoverished Caribbean country announced plans for major fuel price hikes — 38 per cent for gasoline, 47 per cent for diesel and 51 per cent for kerosene.The announcement sparked mass protests, with streets in the capital Port-au-Prince and other cities blocked with barricades of debris and burning tires.Dozens of shops were looted and burned and cars were set ablaze. At least four people were killed. The government quickly did an about-face and called off the planned price increases.Lafontant, a physician who had little political experience before taking office in February 2017, had faced widespread criticism even before the spasm of violence.Several hundred protesters marched on Saturday in Port-au-Prince demanding the departure not just of Lafontant, but also of president Jovenel Moise.”It’s not just a question of changing the prime minister, because day by day, the people are still suffering from more misery, unemployment, insecurity, hunger,” said Fleurette Pierre, one of the demonstrators.Haiti is desperately poor: around 60 per cent of its people live on less than two dollars a day, and they are extremely sensitive to even minor increases in prices of just about anything.In February, Haiti signed an agreement with the International Monetary Fund, the Washington-based global crisis lender, in which the country committed to carrying out economic and structural reforms to promote growth.- ‘More gradual approach’ -One of those conditions was the elimination of petroleum product subsidies, prompting the doomed price hike proposal.The accord also called on the government to keep inflation under 10 per cent.Since 2015, inflation has been running at 13 to 14 per cent annually. The budget blueprint submitted to the legislature in late June still foresaw a rate of 13.6 per cent.On Thursday, the IMF suggested “a more gradual approach” to ending fuel subsidies, paired with “compensatory and mitigating measures to protect the most vulnerable people.””We will continue to support Haiti… as they develop a revised reform strategy,” IMF spokesman Gerry Rice said, noting that ending subsidies would free up funds for other programmes such as education.Crafting a revised strategy — and divvying up Haiti’s meagre budget resources — will be a delicate task.The decision to scrap the price hikes means the government will have to find another way to come up with the $300 million the move would have generated.It is not an insignificant amount — the total is more than 11 per cent of the 2018-2019 budget presented to parliament in June for debate.Now, Moise’s government has to find a way to appease all sides — angry and impatient consumers, politicians with varying interests and IMF economists.Haiti’s deep levels of inequality are often cited by protesters who want both Lafontant and Moise out of office.More than 200 years after gaining independence from France, Haiti is still ranked by the World Bank as having one of earth’s most unjust societies.last_img read more

Pollution of a sacred river becomes a symbol for Indias environmental challenge

first_img News • Photos of the Week By: Priyadarshini Sen Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! A United Methodist group proposes a denominational breakup Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,BANGALORE, India (RNS) — In the pre-dawn light, Srikara Sudarshana circumambulates the Gali Anjaneya Swami Temple at a busy intersection in this city in southern India, known as the country’s tech capital.The 20-year-old priest chants Sanskrit mantras in front of a 700-year-old saffron-colored idol of the god Hanuman. According to ancient tradition the priest then bathes the deity, but instead of using water from the nearby Vrishabhavathi River, Sudarshana cleanses the idol with 30 liters of filtered water from the temple’s kitchen.The temple, one of Bangalore’s historic treasures depicting scenes from the Indian epic Ramayana, is flanked by factories producing lead acid batteries and textiles. The Vrishabhavathi, choked with industrial waste, gives off a noxious odor.“It’s no longer a river but a frothing mass of sewage discharged from industrial, agricultural and residential areas of the catchment,” said Sudarshana.It wasn’t so long ago when the Vrishabhavathi’s waters were potable. According to local myth, the river originated from the hoof of a sacred bull at a hillock nearby. A tributary of one of the most important rivers in India, the Kaveri, it was a key artery and source of livelihood for Bangalore’s residents and farmers.Priest Srikara Sudarshana feeds filtered water to an idol of Hanuman god at Gali Anjaneya Swami Temple in Bangalore, India. RNS photo by Priyadarshini Sen“The bull is believed to be the vehicle of Lord Shiva, the source of creation and destruction of the universe,” said Tulasi Srinivas, a professor of anthropology at Emerson College in Boston, who has been studying water scarcity in Bangalore over the past decade. “It is incumbent that out of this destruction we must find new ways of re-creating our ecology.”When the Vrishabhavathi flowed past the Hanuman temple as a pristine river, devotees bathed before entering the temple complex holding pitchers of holy water.“The water was so pure our forefathers could even drink it,” said Srinivasa Ramanuja, a senior priest wearing a single piece of unstitched cloth and girdle around his waist. “During the rains, it would enter the temple and caress the feet of lord Hanuman.”But with the tech boom in Bangalore in the early 1990s, the city’s growth, fueled by successive governments’ ambitious agendas, outstripped its waste management plans.Trees around catchment areas of lakes were cut down and aquifers were tapped to build out suburbs. As a result, the lakes dried up and the city government gave permits to private institutions to build on the lake bed.In 2017, the World Economic Forum named Bangalore the world’s most dynamic city for its entrepreneurial spirit, innovation and technology, as well as its salubrious climate. But while paper mills, chemical and electroplating plants, textiles, distilleries, tanneries and rubber factories sprung up everywhere, attracting skilled workforces from around the world, they also discharged their effluents into the river.Trash floats in the Vrishabhavathi River near the Gali Anjaneya Swami Temple in Bangalore, India. RNS photo by Priyadarshini SenEven the Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board, overburdened by the city’s waste, connected the sewer lines to the river. It permitted the effluents to pollute the river to such an extent that marine life was killed off.Besides its effect on ritual observances, the frothing mass of water that flows past the temple today is a potential health risk. Villagers downstream complain of diseases such as gastroenteritis, cancer and abdominal, heart, skin and kidney ailments.“The pollution control board has connived with industries to violate environmental norms. Law enforcement agencies should be held accountable,” said Yellappa Reddy, the chairman of Bangalore Environment Trust, an nongovernmental organization of scientists in the city.Enraged by the negligence of government agencies and politicians, Reddy plans to file a petition at the Karnataka high court this month.Politicians and Hindu nationalists, many of whom are frequent visitors to the temple, are accused of turning a blind eye to the toxicity of the river despite the protests.“Priests are ready to take action if leaders support the resuscitation of our river,” said 55-year-old Ramachandra Bhattacharya, who pours libations on the deity every day. “Even though the public works department has been told to step up their work, the government officers are simply dragging their feet,” he said.UB City, a luxury mall, dominates the skyline of Bangalore, India. The city has seen a major tech boom since the 1990s. Photo by Prateek Karandikar/Creative CommonsIn 2014, the Bangalore Municipal Corp. installed flood control gates around the temple to prevent the river water from entering the inner sanctum during heavy rains.Even then, the priests complained that the development of the temple was not enough if the environment around their place of worship was not sanitized.“Now, garbage trucks haul the river’s waste once in six months or so,” said Manoj Bhattacharya, an assistant priest. “Some effluents are pushed to the banks instead of being transported to a landfill or waste treatment facility.”Though heavy metals, electroplates, dyes and electronic waste have been found in the river through studies by scientists and environmental watchdogs, industries have washed their hands of the problem.“We don’t dispose industrial waste and have our own sewage treatment plant,” said Sankarapandian Sankaravelayutham, a senior deputy general manager at Amco Batteries Ltd., one of the oldest factories in the region.“The government should encourage rainwater harvesting and not give approval to builders who fail to come up with sewage treatment plans for their constructions.”The deputy general manager of Karnataka Vidyuth Karkhane Ltd., a manufacturer of electrical transformers, pins the blame on chemical, plastic and textile industries.“We outsource our waste to a scrap transport corporation, so we have nothing to do with the river’s pollution,” said MV Srinivasaiah. “The effluents may be from chemical and textile industries.”Government agencies have also been shortsighted about their sewage treatment plans since they haven’t kept up with the city’s growth and population.Tushar Giri Nath, the chairman of Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board, said the development of the city has shrunk the watershed area, so every section of the society needs to be held accountable.“We are setting up nine new plants to treat sewage, but the industries must have their own effluent treatment plants,” said Nath. “The pollution control board should monitor the quality of water and residents must be more conscious.”A servitor prepares to use a newly installed water purification machine at Gali Anjaneya Swami Temple in Bangalore, India. RNS photo by Priyadarshini SenThree years ago, the priests took matters in their hands, installing the purifier that now filters water from a well dredged within the temple’s precincts. Last month, they replaced it with a high-end machine that distills up to 1,000 liters a day.“This came as a psychological balm for us,” said Manjunatha, an official at a health insurance company in Bangalore. “More devotees will flock to the temple knowing that Lord Hanuman has finally blessed us with clean water.”Armed with filtered water, the priests go about their daily rituals. They bless worshippers, pour libations on the deity, chant mantras and prepare consecrated food.The devotees wash their feet in clean water and then circle the temple in clockwise manner holding flowers, basil leaves and knotted betel leaf garlands. On reaching the altar, they bow their heads low as priests sprinkle filtered water over their heads.“We are still not sure of the water quality, but we believe in god. Industrialists and politicians have exploited our river because they are faithless people,” said Bhavna, an engineering student whose forefathers also worshipped at the temple.Having done what they can, Gali Anjaneya Swami temple priests idealize a time when the Hanuman deity was in a forested area before urban settlements came up.“We may never get our river back, but at least the powers above are protecting us from contaminated water,” said Sudarshana. “Our faith has grown stronger.” Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email News By: Priyadarshini Sen Photos of the Week August 30, 2019 Share This! Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 Share This! Share This! By: Priyadarshini Sen Priyadarshini Sen,Load Comments,Texas imam ordered to pay $2.55 million in sexual misconduct case TagsBangalore faith and environment Hindu temples Hinduism homepage featured India sacred river technology,You may also like Catholicism Priyadarshini Senlast_img read more

Louisville Faces Michigan and Michigan State on Sunday

first_imgSCHEDULE9 a.m. – 2N8+ (Michigan, Louisville, Michigan State)9:20 a.m. – N8+ (Michigan State, Michigan, Louisville)9:40 a.m. – 3V4+ (Louisville, Michigan State, Michigan, Michigan 4V4+)10 a.m. – 2V4+ (Michigan, Louisville, Michigan State)10:20 a.m. – V4+ (Michigan State, Michigan, Louisville)10:40 a.m. – 2V8+ (Louisville, Michigan State, Michigan)11 a.m. – V8+ (Michigan, Louisville, Michigan State) LOUISVILLE, Ky. – In their final outing before the ACC Championship, the University of Louisville rowing team heads north for a dual race against Michigan and Michigan State Sunday morning at Belleville Lake in Van Buren Township, Mich. Sunday’s dual marks a return to the water for the Cards, who have not competed in an official race since the Sunshine State Invitational on April 6 in Sarasota. Two weeks ago, Louisville was among 21 schools impacted by the cancellation of the Clemson Invitational due to severe storms and debris on the course. Story Links Print Friendly Version The big focus was the second 1K and we didn’t get a chance to demonstrate that because of the water. We always deal with this sort of thing, so we might be in a good situation. It puts a lot of pressure on ACCs.” Live results from the dual will be available on Twitter through Michigan at @umichrowing, followed by a full recap on GoCards.com. Although the varsity eight and second varsity eight raced on Saturday morning, the regatta’s cancellation nullified the results of those races. Despite a lack of time on the water, Copeland was impressed by his team’s preparation and competitive drive.center_img In the limited action, Copeland and his staff were able to gain some insight on the team’s performance as they look forward to returning to Lake Hartwell for the ACC Championship. “We needed a race because we’ve made a lot of gains between early April and now, and it’s good to see incremental demonstration of the gains,” said Copeland. “We did race, and the first 1K of the race was pretty fair, so we have an idea of where we were at that point. Following Sunday’s meet, the Cardinals will turn their attention toward the ACC Championship on May 17-18 at Clemson. The regatta opens with the preliminary heats on Friday evening at 5:30 p.m., followed by the grand finals on Saturday beginning at 8 a.m. “There were probably five or six different false alarms to go race, and for them to be emotionally and mentally ready to race five or six times was pretty remarkable,” said Copeland. “The fact that there was that much duress and they were always ready to race each time, that’s not something that I’ve ever seen before—a team that dialed in.” Louisville is making its seventh consecutive trip to Michigan, continuing a series that has provided multiple benefits for the program in preparation for their conference championship. The Wolverines are currently ranked No. 5 in the CRCA coaches’ poll, while both the Cardinals and Spartans received votes. Cardinals head coach Derek Copeland said that the Michigan regatta allows for his team to leave Louisville on Kentucky Derby weekend to face a nationally-ranked crew in challenging conditions following the end of the academic year. For this season, the addition of Michigan State also provides another opponent for improving the Cards’ NCAA Championship resume.last_img read more

There is nothing called Writers Block

first_img“I never call it Writer’s Block because I know I have to write anyway. I write bad pages if I am feeling blocked and eventually I end up losing them which is painful. But everyday’s hard work is sort of inspirational,” Greer said at the 10th edition of Apeejay Kolkata Literary Festival. The American, who bagged the Pulitzer for his comic novel ‘Less’ in 2018, said he is not going to write anything on his new novel while “in India because it is too much fun here and I am taking a break”. Asked to share some tips for aspiring writers to keep their creativity alive, the man with six fictions in his kitty said: “I think that one should write from their weakest part and about things they are scared to share.” Also Read – Add new books to your shelfHe elaborated that if there is anything hard to write about oneself, it is truly about the person. So it is good to be imaginative to be able to reveal those things in writing. “If someone says to a writer that he/she puts too many dragons in his writing, he should put a full dragon. That is my advice and one shouldn’t let people make them mediocre and become oneself,” he explained. Geere had been writing ‘Less’ as a tragedy and it was not really working when he actually decided to start making fun of the protagonist and while swimming one day he made up his mind to write this book as a comedy. He wanted to celebrate joy. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveAsked if such recognition can be beneficial for any genre which is going out of fashion, he said: “I hadn’t thought about it, but yes it is possible that this will give courage to other writers to write literature that is a comedy or all of those things that people are bit ashamed to speak about. And especially it gives me a chance to write more on such topics.” ‘Less’ is about Arthur Less, a writer fleeing the humiliation of love, middle-age and failure. In his book, a character actually wins the Pulitzer Prize. “I am confident that this is the only book which talks about Pulitzer and then actually wins it. It never occurred to me that I would actually win it,” he said. The protagonist wears a bright blue suit for the awards which, according to Greer, symbolises his innocence and he wears it with confidence. He thought he would choose something sober for himself in real life but on a friend’s advice he “wore a red suit” for the awards as it symbolises joy.last_img read more