Martin Luther King Community Choir celebrates 20 years with Pastor Ken Anderson

first_img March 21, 2018 Dave Scott Martin Luther King Community Choir celebrates 20 years with Pastor Ken Anderson Dave Scott, Updated: 5:58 PMcenter_img Posted: March 21, 2018 For more than two decades, the Martin Luther King Community Choir of San Diego has been thrilling audiences across the county with their powerful voices.The award-winning gospel choir has performed around the world and will soon focus its talent in San Diego on a series of special concerts.On April 7th, the Choir will perform at the KROC Center in Rolando. The show celebrates the Choir’s 20th anniversary and is under the direction of Pastor Ken Anderson.We will also be featuring a lady named Arnessa Jones. Arnessa is also producing a show called “All About the Blues.” This show is on May 19th and features the Choir of which Arnessa is a member. But she is also a talented playwright.KUSI’s Dave Scott was in Rolando this evening where the choir is rehearsing for their big shows. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

The Future Does Not Exist

first_imgThe point here is that as the media world changes, what seems dominant today may turn out to be yesterday’s news in short order. Remember CompuServe, AOL, etc.? I could go on, but you get the point. So while the “Reimagining the Future (While We Still Have Time)” conference provided no real visionary solutions, because that’s impossible, it did offer a mosaic of opinion and perspective, when combined into a whole, provided a good look at where the industry is now and where it needs to go. The future doesn’t exist because we haven’t built it yet.And even more important, the students at the University of Mississippi were full participants. Anyone who spent a few days with the young journalists at that conference couldn’t help coming away with a new confidence about the future of the profession. These people are bright, energetic, savvy and ready to take the reins. Here is a list of some of the student participants. I wanted to acknowledge each of them by name, because they were all so impressive.Undergraduate Journalism Students:Natalie Dickson Kirby Sage Elizabeth Pearson Alex Pence Maggie Giffin Markus Simmons Katie Williamson Ja’juan McNeil Rashell Reese Addison Dent Houston Cofield Ren Turner Nick Toce (also event photographer)Alex McDaniel (also event coordinator) That phrase was the title of one of the presentations at Samir Husni’s recent conference, called “Reimagining the Future (While We Still Have Time),” and held at the Magazine Innovation Center in Oxford, Mississippi. The presentation was made by Thomaz Souto Correa, the vice president of editorial at The Abril Group in Brazil. And while Correa discussed many things, there is a particular idea in that title worth thinking about. Perhaps the future doesn’t exist because no one, and I mean no one, knows what it’s going to look like even two years from now. Think about one of the biggest debates of the last few years—whether to charge for online content. When Steve Brill and Walter Isaacson and Rupert Murdoch and others suggested that the status quo was unsustainable, the purveyors of the conventional wisdom came down hard. The cat’s out of the bag, they said. Stop thinking like it’s 1997. Start building a business for the Google economy. There’s no other choice.Well, one thing none of those wizards thought of was how mobile apps and iPads would change the equation. Now, suddenly, there’s a path to paid content online, because there’s a significant migration away from the free Internet and in the direction of apps you have to buy. Or apps from which publishers sell subscriptions to their content. last_img read more

Wilmington Seniors At Shawsheen Tech Encouraged To Apply For Special Rotary Scholarships

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Rotary District 7903, which includes Wilmington, is offering ten $500.00 scholarships to graduating seniors that attend a Technical High School.The scholarships will be awarded to seniors that plan to pursue a trade after graduation. The funds can be used to obtain a certificate or license as well as to purchase tools for their trade (electrician, plumber, automotive mechanic, carpenter, beautician etc.)This award is funded by Annual Giving donations to The Rotary Foundation.The application can be found HERE. The application has also been sent to the Shawsheen Tech’s Guidance Department.The application deadline is April 19. The Scholarship Committee will meet in late April to select the winning candidates.(NOTE: The above information was submitted by the Wilmington Rotary Club.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedTickets Still Available For Wilmington Rotary Trivia Night On June 14In “Community”Wilmington’s Ice Bucket Challenge Raises $5K For ALS Research, 100+ WHS Students ParticipateIn “Community”VIDEO: Watch The 2019 Shawsheen Tech Scholarship NightIn “Education”last_img read more

Man held with 14 gold bars

first_imgGold bars. File PhotoMembers of Border Guard Bangladesh (BGB) detained a suspected gold smuggler along with 14 gold bars from Putkhali border area of Benapole in Jashore on Saturday evening, reports UNB.The arrestee is Dilip Halder, 35, son of a certain Khudiram Halder.Being informed that a consignment of gold was being smuggled to India, a team of BGB conducted a raid and detained Dilip along with the gold bars weighing 1.630 kilogram worth Tk 8.5 million, said lieutenant colonel Imram Ullah Sarker, commander of BGB-21 battalion.The detainee was handed over to Benapole Port police station after filing of a case in this connection.last_img

Pollution of a sacred river becomes a symbol for Indias environmental challenge

first_img News • Photos of the Week By: Priyadarshini Sen Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! A United Methodist group proposes a denominational breakup Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,BANGALORE, India (RNS) — In the pre-dawn light, Srikara Sudarshana circumambulates the Gali Anjaneya Swami Temple at a busy intersection in this city in southern India, known as the country’s tech capital.The 20-year-old priest chants Sanskrit mantras in front of a 700-year-old saffron-colored idol of the god Hanuman. According to ancient tradition the priest then bathes the deity, but instead of using water from the nearby Vrishabhavathi River, Sudarshana cleanses the idol with 30 liters of filtered water from the temple’s kitchen.The temple, one of Bangalore’s historic treasures depicting scenes from the Indian epic Ramayana, is flanked by factories producing lead acid batteries and textiles. The Vrishabhavathi, choked with industrial waste, gives off a noxious odor.“It’s no longer a river but a frothing mass of sewage discharged from industrial, agricultural and residential areas of the catchment,” said Sudarshana.It wasn’t so long ago when the Vrishabhavathi’s waters were potable. According to local myth, the river originated from the hoof of a sacred bull at a hillock nearby. A tributary of one of the most important rivers in India, the Kaveri, it was a key artery and source of livelihood for Bangalore’s residents and farmers.Priest Srikara Sudarshana feeds filtered water to an idol of Hanuman god at Gali Anjaneya Swami Temple in Bangalore, India. RNS photo by Priyadarshini Sen“The bull is believed to be the vehicle of Lord Shiva, the source of creation and destruction of the universe,” said Tulasi Srinivas, a professor of anthropology at Emerson College in Boston, who has been studying water scarcity in Bangalore over the past decade. “It is incumbent that out of this destruction we must find new ways of re-creating our ecology.”When the Vrishabhavathi flowed past the Hanuman temple as a pristine river, devotees bathed before entering the temple complex holding pitchers of holy water.“The water was so pure our forefathers could even drink it,” said Srinivasa Ramanuja, a senior priest wearing a single piece of unstitched cloth and girdle around his waist. “During the rains, it would enter the temple and caress the feet of lord Hanuman.”But with the tech boom in Bangalore in the early 1990s, the city’s growth, fueled by successive governments’ ambitious agendas, outstripped its waste management plans.Trees around catchment areas of lakes were cut down and aquifers were tapped to build out suburbs. As a result, the lakes dried up and the city government gave permits to private institutions to build on the lake bed.In 2017, the World Economic Forum named Bangalore the world’s most dynamic city for its entrepreneurial spirit, innovation and technology, as well as its salubrious climate. But while paper mills, chemical and electroplating plants, textiles, distilleries, tanneries and rubber factories sprung up everywhere, attracting skilled workforces from around the world, they also discharged their effluents into the river.Trash floats in the Vrishabhavathi River near the Gali Anjaneya Swami Temple in Bangalore, India. RNS photo by Priyadarshini SenEven the Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board, overburdened by the city’s waste, connected the sewer lines to the river. It permitted the effluents to pollute the river to such an extent that marine life was killed off.Besides its effect on ritual observances, the frothing mass of water that flows past the temple today is a potential health risk. Villagers downstream complain of diseases such as gastroenteritis, cancer and abdominal, heart, skin and kidney ailments.“The pollution control board has connived with industries to violate environmental norms. Law enforcement agencies should be held accountable,” said Yellappa Reddy, the chairman of Bangalore Environment Trust, an nongovernmental organization of scientists in the city.Enraged by the negligence of government agencies and politicians, Reddy plans to file a petition at the Karnataka high court this month.Politicians and Hindu nationalists, many of whom are frequent visitors to the temple, are accused of turning a blind eye to the toxicity of the river despite the protests.“Priests are ready to take action if leaders support the resuscitation of our river,” said 55-year-old Ramachandra Bhattacharya, who pours libations on the deity every day. “Even though the public works department has been told to step up their work, the government officers are simply dragging their feet,” he said.UB City, a luxury mall, dominates the skyline of Bangalore, India. The city has seen a major tech boom since the 1990s. Photo by Prateek Karandikar/Creative CommonsIn 2014, the Bangalore Municipal Corp. installed flood control gates around the temple to prevent the river water from entering the inner sanctum during heavy rains.Even then, the priests complained that the development of the temple was not enough if the environment around their place of worship was not sanitized.“Now, garbage trucks haul the river’s waste once in six months or so,” said Manoj Bhattacharya, an assistant priest. “Some effluents are pushed to the banks instead of being transported to a landfill or waste treatment facility.”Though heavy metals, electroplates, dyes and electronic waste have been found in the river through studies by scientists and environmental watchdogs, industries have washed their hands of the problem.“We don’t dispose industrial waste and have our own sewage treatment plant,” said Sankarapandian Sankaravelayutham, a senior deputy general manager at Amco Batteries Ltd., one of the oldest factories in the region.“The government should encourage rainwater harvesting and not give approval to builders who fail to come up with sewage treatment plans for their constructions.”The deputy general manager of Karnataka Vidyuth Karkhane Ltd., a manufacturer of electrical transformers, pins the blame on chemical, plastic and textile industries.“We outsource our waste to a scrap transport corporation, so we have nothing to do with the river’s pollution,” said MV Srinivasaiah. “The effluents may be from chemical and textile industries.”Government agencies have also been shortsighted about their sewage treatment plans since they haven’t kept up with the city’s growth and population.Tushar Giri Nath, the chairman of Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board, said the development of the city has shrunk the watershed area, so every section of the society needs to be held accountable.“We are setting up nine new plants to treat sewage, but the industries must have their own effluent treatment plants,” said Nath. “The pollution control board should monitor the quality of water and residents must be more conscious.”A servitor prepares to use a newly installed water purification machine at Gali Anjaneya Swami Temple in Bangalore, India. RNS photo by Priyadarshini SenThree years ago, the priests took matters in their hands, installing the purifier that now filters water from a well dredged within the temple’s precincts. Last month, they replaced it with a high-end machine that distills up to 1,000 liters a day.“This came as a psychological balm for us,” said Manjunatha, an official at a health insurance company in Bangalore. “More devotees will flock to the temple knowing that Lord Hanuman has finally blessed us with clean water.”Armed with filtered water, the priests go about their daily rituals. They bless worshippers, pour libations on the deity, chant mantras and prepare consecrated food.The devotees wash their feet in clean water and then circle the temple in clockwise manner holding flowers, basil leaves and knotted betel leaf garlands. On reaching the altar, they bow their heads low as priests sprinkle filtered water over their heads.“We are still not sure of the water quality, but we believe in god. Industrialists and politicians have exploited our river because they are faithless people,” said Bhavna, an engineering student whose forefathers also worshipped at the temple.Having done what they can, Gali Anjaneya Swami temple priests idealize a time when the Hanuman deity was in a forested area before urban settlements came up.“We may never get our river back, but at least the powers above are protecting us from contaminated water,” said Sudarshana. “Our faith has grown stronger.” Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email News By: Priyadarshini Sen Photos of the Week August 30, 2019 Share This! Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 Share This! Share This! By: Priyadarshini Sen Priyadarshini Sen,Load Comments,Texas imam ordered to pay $2.55 million in sexual misconduct case TagsBangalore faith and environment Hindu temples Hinduism homepage featured India sacred river technology,You may also like Catholicism Priyadarshini Senlast_img read more

Heres What Your Favorite Music Says About Your Personality

first_imgYour taste in music could reveal insights into your personality, according to two studies published in Psychological Science. Previous attempts at finding links between music and personality traits didn’t necessarily represent a wide variety of people because the respondents tended to be younger – thus more likely to share similar music tastes – and had varying definitions of the musical genres they were listening to. This time around, more than half of the respondents were older than 22 and all were presented with 25 unfamiliar musical extracts pre-categorized by musicologists. “These results corroborate that music – a form of self-expression that is ubiquitous across human cultures – communicates meaningful information about basic psychological characteristics,” said the authors in their study. Read the whole story: IFLSciencecenter_img Researchers from Cambridge and US universities surveyed more than 21,000 people in two separate online surveys to see how five main personality types known collectively as the Big Five – those that are open-minded, extroverted, agreeable, neurotic, and conscientious – matched up with different genres of music. These included tunes that were mellow, unpretentious, sophisticated, intense, and contemporary. last_img read more