September 28 2005 On Sunday October 2 2005

first_imgSeptember 28, 2005 On Sunday, October 2, 2005 at 3 pm Sonya Kumiko Lee will play works by Bach, Beethoven, Ginastera , Tchaikovsky and Chopin to celebrate the 24th annual Colly Concert at the Colly Soleri Music Center Amphitheater. This concert honors the memory of Cosanti Foundation Co-Founder Colly Woods Soleri who with Paolo Soleri founded the Cosanti Foundation. Colly was an avid supporter of art and cultural events during her lifetime and the tradition has continued through the Colly Soleri Music Center’s Concert Season which continues to bring excellent music to the high desert. Concert-goers may choose to follow a complimentary one hour tour at 11, 12, 1 or 2 and enjoy a gourmet luncheon between noon and 2 pm consisting of Roasted Red Pepper and Coconut Soup, Mixed Green Salad with Sweet Pecans, Blue Cheese, Pears and Arcosanti Peach Vinaigrette Dressing, Butternut Squash with Orange Cranberry Glaze, Broccoli Rabe with Roasted Garlic, Portobello Pizzas with Fresh Tomatoes and Goat Cheese, Flank steak on Greens with Mango and Pepper Sauces and Hazelnut Custard with Chocolate. Tickets are $30.00 for Luncheon and Concert , $15.00 for Concert Only, $7.50 Student Concert Only. Reservations are required. [Photo: Sonya-Kumiko Lee & text: Cosanti Foundation]last_img read more

Recommended Links

first_img Recommended Links — – Last Chance: VIP Access To Doug Casey’s Shocking 2016 Forecast Doug Casey fears a severe crisis is brewing. Not a currency collapse or stock market crash. A specific threat that could wreak more havoc than the Great Depression. That’s why tomorrow, in an urgent broadcast event, Doug’s pulling back the curtain on his shocking warning. And revealing how to profit from it in the months ahead, in a big way. Last chance to get VIP access ends tonight. Click here now for full details. Is Now the Time to Buy Silver or Gold? Dr. Steve Sjuggerud: “One critical number will tell you if now is the perfect time to buy gold, silver, or the best precious metals stocks. This is how you get the biggest gains.” Full story here…center_img One of America’s key industries just gave us another warning sign… Last Wednesday, stock in Macy’s (M)—the largest department store in the U.S. and an iconic American brand—plunged 15%. The next day, department store Kohl’s (KSS) fell 9%… And on Friday, high-end retailer Nordstrom (JWN) joined the bloodbath, dropping 13%. The massive selloff—which the media is calling the “Retail Wreck”—was due to terrible first-quarter results. This is the latest bad news in what’s been an extremely ugly earnings season. As you may know, earnings season is when companies tell investors if earnings grew or shrank last quarter. A strong earnings season can send stocks higher. A bad one—like we’re in right now—can cause stocks to crash. Companies in the S&P 500 are on track to show a 7.1% decline in earnings. That would mark the fourth straight quarter that earnings have fallen. That hasn’t happened since the 2008-2009 financial crisis. • Retail companies have been some of the biggest losers this earnings season… Macy’s reported a 5.6% drop in its “same-store sales” last week. This metric measures how much sales rose or fell at stores that have been open for at least a year. Because it strips out the sales bump from opening new stores, same-store sales can tell us more about the health of a company than total sales. Macy’s sales decline last quarter was its biggest since 2009. As we mentioned, Kohl’s also had a poor quarter. Its same-store sales fell 3.9%, its biggest decline since 2009. And Nordstrom reported a 1.7% decline in same-store sales. • The retail sector can tell us a lot about the U.S. economy… This industry is a reliable economic indicator. It often flashes early warning signs when trouble is ahead. It’s not hard to see why. Consumer spending makes up 67% of the U.S. economy. When the economy slows, folks will stop buying designer jeans and expensive cologne to make sure they don’t miss a mortgage payment. They’ll hold off on buying a new watch to save money for the essentials. Today, many of America’s biggest retailers are trading like we’re in a recession. Macy’s is down 56% over the past year. Nordstrom is down 51%. Kohl’s is down 48%. • We don’t think these companies will recover anytime soon, either… If you’ve been reading the Dispatch, you know we think the U.S. economy is stalling out. The signs are all around. Corporate profits are drying up. Huge companies are laying off workers by the thousands. Global trade has practically come to a standstill. A slowing economy is bad for most companies. It’s especially bad for companies that sell “want” items—or things people would like to buy, but don’t need. “Want” items are the first place people cut spending when the economy slows. They buy off the clearance rack rather than the latest fashions. Nordstrom customers are already starting to cut back. Business Insider reported last week: Comparable sales for Nordstrom’s full-price businesses fell 5.4%, including a 7.7% drop at its US department stores… While sales are plunging in Nordstrom’s full-price business, comparable sales for the company’s off-price brands, including Nordstrom Rack—which sells steeply discounting clothes and accessories—grew 4.6%. According to Investment bank Morgan Stanley (MS), Nordstrom customers aren’t the only ones changing their spending habits. Business Insider continues: “Notably, this shortfall was entirely driven by lower trips/transactions,” Morgan Stanley analysts wrote in a note ominously titled “High-End Recession.” The declines confirm a terrifying new reality for high-end retailers: Wealthy shoppers are reining in spending and, along with the rest of American consumers, refusing to pay full price for anything. • Americans aren’t spending money like they used to… Macy’s and Kohl’s both blamed their bad results on the weather. They said folks bought fewer coats and scarves due to an “unfavorably warm winter.” Companies often blame the weather or other things beyond their control when they have a poor quarter. It’s much easier to do this than admit business is bad. We aren’t buying this excuse. Retail companies have much bigger problems than a warm winter. For one, Americans aren’t spending money like they used to. Fortune reported last week: Department store operators have been hit in the past year as consumers choose to spend on smartphones and electronics, dining out and travel, and invest in assets such as vehicles and homes. • Retail giant Amazon (AMZN) is eating “brick-and-mortar” retailers alive… Amazon isn’t your traditional retailer. It doesn’t own huge stores or employ thousands of cashiers. It runs an online store where you can buy just about anything with a few clicks of a mouse. It’s also one of the world’s most dominant companies. Its sales have increased for 77 consecutive quarters. Last year, the company’s sales topped $100 billion for the first time. Amazon has changed how people shop. That’s bad news for traditional retailers like Macy’s, Nordstrom, and Kohl’s. The chart below says it all… Last quarter, earnings for department stores in the S&P 500 plunged 48%. Meanwhile, earnings for large online retailers jumped 143%. Online retailers are stealing business from companies like Macy’s and Nordstrom. Amazon is the big reason why. Regards, Justin Spittler Delray Beach, Florida May 18, 2016 We want to hear from you. If you have a question or comment, please send it to feedback@caseyresearch.com. We read every email that comes in, and we’ll publish comments, questions, and answers that we think other readers will find useful. • E.B. Tucker, editor of The Casey Report, warned the retail industry was in trouble in November… Retail stocks were still hot at the time. The SPDR S&P Retail ETF (XRT), which holds 99 major retailers, was up 408% since March 2009. That was more than double the S&P 500’s 203% return in the same period. E.B. said retail sales were slowing, and warned that the retail stocks would soon rollover. He also warned that problems in the retail sector would soon show up in other parts of the economy: Consumers cut back spending on mostly unnecessary items first. Pretty soon, Americans are going to stop buying steak and start buying hamburger. When the economy sours, every penny counts. Before you know it, people are pawning off all the expensive junk they bought with cheap credit since the last financial crisis. That’s one way markets unwind seven years of excess borrowing and spending. Several major American retailers have tanked since E.B. made this warning. Watch maker Fossil (FOSL) is down 21%. Department store Sears (SHLD) is down 49%. Furniture company Restoration Hardware (RH) has plunged 64%. • E.B. is still worried about the economy… He’s advising Casey Report readers to “crisis-proof” their portfolios. E.B. recommends holding cash and physical gold. A cash reserve will save you from losing money if stocks sell off. It will also prepare you for the next big buying opportunity in stocks. Owning gold is another simple way to protect your wealth. That’s because it’s the ultimate safe-haven asset. It’s served as money for centuries. It’s protected wealth through history’s worst financial crises. And gold could also make you a lot of money if stocks crash. It’s already starting to take off… This year, the price of gold has jumped 21%. It’s at its highest price since January 2015. E.B. recommends you keep 10% to 15% of your wealth in gold to protect your portfolio against a stock crash or financial crisis. • E.B. isn’t avoiding stocks completely… He recommends owning companies that “feed the masses.” E.B. likes these stocks for a simple reason: people have to eat. Unlike retailers that sell “want” items, companies that sell food can do well no matter what happens with the economy. One of those stocks, Archer Daniels Midland (ADM), is up 21% since January. E.B. thinks ADM will keep rising even if the economy continues to struggle. That said, E.B. doesn’t recommend buying the stock at current prices. He rates ADM as a Hold after its big jump. But if you want to profit from “feeding the masses,” E.B. has another stock you can buy today. It’s a world-class agricultural product company with an impressive dividend history. You probably have this company’s top brand in your pantry right now… This stock is up 14% since January. It’s also paying a 5.4% dividend yield. That’s more than double the S&P 500’s 2.1% dividend yield. You can invest alongside E.B. by signing up for The Casey Report. Click here to begin your risk-free trial. • REMINDER: Today is your last chance to sign up for our Crisis Investing workshop… If you’ve been reading the Dispatch, you know we’re hosting a very special training event tomorrow. During this training series, you will learn one of the most powerful wealth-building strategies. Legendary investors like Warren Buffett, Jim Rogers, and even our own Doug Casey all used this strategy to build their fortunes. For the first time ever, Doug will share this great wealth-building secret in a free series of online training videos. You’ll also discover why this strategy has never been more crucial. It could up end being one of the most important events in our company’s history. If you’re interested, don’t wait to sign up. After today, we will close the doors to this free training series. Click here to reserve your spot. Chart of the Day Amazon hasn’t just crushed retailers. It’s crushed the entire stock market. Today’s chart shows the performance of Amazon over the past seven years. As you can see, the stock has been ripping higher. It’s up 935% since March 2009. That’s more than five times the return of the S&P 500. Chris Wood, editor of Extraordinary Technology, thinks Amazon will keep rising…but that doesn’t mean you should buy it at today’s levels. Here’s Chris: I like Amazon a lot as a long-term investment. It’s the seventh largest company in the U.S. in terms of market cap. Companies this huge often have trouble growing. But Amazon is growing as quickly as a much smaller company. Still, if you’re the type of investor who hold stocks for a year or less, I’d recommend staying away from Amazon right now. The stock has been making higher highs and higher lows since late March. This indicates a clear uptrend, which is a good thing. But the stock is getting expensive… Its price-to-sales ratio is up to 2.9, which is well above its five-year historical average of 2.1. In other words, investors are paying more for each dollar of Amazon’s sales today than they have in the past. Investors are paying a “premium” even though Amazon’s sales aren’t growing as fast as they have been. Annual revenue growth over the past year was 20%. That’s well below its five-year average of 26%. Slowing sales and a high valuation aren’t the only reasons to avoid Amazon in the near term. Chris explains: Another thing to consider is insiders selling Amazon’s stock. An insider is a person who knows more about a company than the general public. Think CEOs, board members, and upper management. Insiders sell stock for a lot of reasons. They might sell to diversify their holdings, pay for medical care, or take a nice vacation. They may also sell if they think the stock is going down. Amazon insiders have sold 2.2 million shares of Amazon stock over the past year, while buying exactly zero shares on the open market. Just this month, CEO Jeff Bezos sold more than $670 million worth of Amazon stock. There’s no way to know why these insiders are dumping Amazon stock. But it’s another reason to not buy Amazon at current prices. We’ll likely get the opportunity to buy Amazon at much better prices over the next few quarters.last_img read more

Want to reduce your risk of dementia in older age

first_imgWant to reduce your risk of dementia in older age? Move as much as you can.We’ve all heard about techniques to get us more physically active — take the stairs, park the car a bit further from your destination, get up and march in place for a minute or two when standing or sitting at a desk.Now a study finds even simple housework like cooking or cleaning may make a difference in brain health in our 70s and 80s.”Exercise is an inexpensive way to improve health and our study shows it may have a protective effect on the brain,” says Dr. Aron S. Buchman with Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, who led the study.Previous research found just 45 minutes of walking three days a week actually increased brain volume among individuals 65 and older.The new study, published Wednesday in the online issue of Neurology, is unique because Buchman was able to analyze the actual brains of study participants. The findings are a “great thank you” to the participants who agreed to donate their brains for research after death, he says.The study looked at 454 older adults who were 70 or older when the research began. Of those adults, 191 had behavioral signs of dementia and 263 did not. All were given thinking and memory tests every year for 20 years.In the last years of research before death, each participant wore an activity monitor called an accelerometer, similar to a Fitbit, which measured physical activity around the clock — everything from small movements such as walking around the house to more vigorous movements like exercise routines. Researchers collected and evaluated 10 days of movement data for each participant and calculated an average daily activity score.The findings show that higher levels of daily movement were linked to better thinking and memory skills, as measured by the yearly cognitive tests. And when Buchman analyzed brain tissue under a microscope, this finding turned out to be the case even for individuals with at least three signs of Alzheimer’s disease, such as amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Even though these individuals might have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, 30 percent of them had “normal” cognition at death, says Buchman.Why one person shows signs of dementia and another, who has similar degenerative changes in the brain, does not, is a mystery. But Buchman says the new findings suggest that physical activity may be protective, even amidst developing Alzheimer’s. It sort of masks the symptoms, he says, and is an “empowering finding” suggesting you can have some control over your brain health even if you don’t have control over developing Alzheimer’s.”It’s almost as if the physical activity was helping the brain to bypass the physical damage,” says Dr. Tim Church, a preventive medicine specialist with Pennington Biomedical Research Center at Louisiana State University who was not involved in the research. “It appears that physical activity was critical to creating a reserve that protects against those physical damages.”And, while intense activity and exercise is highly beneficial, even light activity can make a difference, says Buchman. “As long as you have some activity and you’re moving, whether you’re chopping onions, typing, sweeping the floor or even running,” you can reduce your risk of cognitive decline.The findings are impressive, says research scientist Carl Cotman, director of the Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia at the University of California, Irvine, showing that physical activity may “offset the ill effects of brain degeneration.” He adds that lifestyle interventions such as an increase in physical activity and movement can be powerful even in the presence of disease. Cotman was not involved in the research.But exactly how the protective effect may work is unclear. Buchman says the current findings are a “great start” but he hopes to look more closely at participant’s brains to measure different proteins and try to identify which ones might link physical activity to better cognition.There are some caveats to the study. The findings do not show clear cause and effect. Study participants with dementia had significantly lower indications of movement compared to those without dementia. It may be possible that as people lose memory and thinking skills, they also reduce their physical activity.And the study did not have data on how active participants were over the course of their lives. It could be that older adults who moved more were also lifelong exercisers so it’s not known if physical activity in early life may have played a role.While previous research suggests that people may be able to beat back dementia with exercise, Buchman acknowledges that “more studies are needed to determine if moving more is truly beneficial to the brain.” Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

WeWork Sues ExEmployee for Disclosing Information to Reporters

first_img WeWork Companies Inc., a closely held operator of shared office space, has sued a former employee for unauthorized disclosure of information to Bloomberg News that showed the firm, which is valued at $16 billion, falling short of its financial goals.In a complaint filed late on Friday with the New York Supreme Court for Manhattan, WeWork accused Joanna Strange, who was fired June 10, of unlawful access to its computers and of stealing confidential and proprietary information. The firm, which operates sites in 40 U.S. and foreign cities, also accused Strange of breaching her contractual and fiduciary duties.Bloomberg reported on Friday that in late April, WeWork in an internal review document slashed a 2016 profit forecast by 78 percent, cut its revenue estimate by 14 percent and disclosed a 63 percent surge in projected negative cash flow.Chief Executive Officer and co-founder Adam Neumann told employees in meetings on May 9 and May 23 that the company had to rein in costs and get its finances in order, according to Bloomberg. WeWork said on Thursday that it reported a case of corporate theft to the U.S. Attorney’s office and that the “stolen document was prepared months ago for scenario planning purposes and does not reflect our robust operating momentum.”Reuters was unable to contact a lawyer for Strange.WeWork said it required all employees to sign an agreement that precluded them from disclosing proprietary information without written approval. This restriction applied both during and after Strange’s employment, the court filing said.After her termination, Strange accessed WeWork’s computers without authorization by using credentials belonging to David Fano, a senior executive, and disclosed the information to reporters, the filing said.WeWork said it was seeking unspecified damages and a trial by jury.Strange may say that at least some of the disclosed information was not truly proprietary, said Dan Eaton, a lecturer at San Diego State University’s College of Business and an employment lawyer. Some information about the company’s finances was known, he said.Strange may say that she had authorized access to the information, Eaton said. In California, granting access to and then misusing information is not a violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act because the anti-hacking statue focuses on access, not misuse, he said.(Reporting by Herbert Lash; Editing by Lisa Von Ahn) WeWork Image credit: Mandel Ngan | Getty Images July 18, 2016 The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List –shares Add to Queuecenter_img WeWork Sues Ex-Employee for Disclosing Information to Reporters Reuters Next Article 2 min read This story originally appeared on Reuters Apply Now »last_img read more

Study Temperaturerelated mortality decreasing in Spain over the past four decades

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 24 2019Temperature-related mortality has been decreasing in Spain over the past four decades, according to a new study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a research center supported by “la Caixa”. The study analyzed the Spanish population’s vulnerability to hot and cold temperatures in the context of global warming.The study, published in The Lancet Planetary Health, analyzed temperatures and deaths related to cardiovascular diseases recorded in 48 Spanish provinces between 1980 and 2016. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in Spain and there is clear evidence of an association between temperature and cardiovascular mortality.The findings show that temperature-related cardiovascular disease mortality was 38.2% lower in the period between 2002 and 2016 than for the period between 1980 and 1994. Analysis of the data in 15-year periods revealed that temperature-related cardiovascular mortality decreased at a rate of more than 17% per decade.Specifically, heat-related cardiovascular mortality for the period 2002-2016 was more than 42% lower in men and more than 36% lower in women than in 1980-1994, while cold-related mortality was 30% lower in women and nearly 45% lower in men.Notable differences were observed between the sexes: heat-related mortality was much higher in women, while men were more vulnerable to cold temperatures. In older people, the risk of death attributable to high temperatures was significantly higher for both sexes, but in the case of cold the increase was significant only for men.”We observed two parallel phenomena,” explained Hicham Achebak, a researcher at ISGlobal and the Centre for Demographic Studies (CED) and lead author of the study. “First, over the past four decades the mean temperature has risen by nearly 1°C. The trend is towards fewer days of moderate or extreme cold temperatures and more days of high temperatures. Second, the Spanish population has adapted to both cold and warm temperatures. The number of deaths at a given temperature is lower now than it was four decades ago.”Related StoriesSP Scientific introduces new system for controlled rate freezing of biological materialsStudy finds increase in fatal opioid overdoses after cold weatherCardiac arrest survivor meets four Good Samaritans who saved his life one year after recoveryThe adaptation observed appears to be due to socioeconomic development and structural improvements–including improvements in housing conditions and health care systems. The authors highlighted a number of socioeconomic developments in Spain, including increases between 1991 and 2009 in per capita income (€8,700 to €22,880) and per capita health care spending (€605 to €2,182). In addition, between 1991 and 2011, the proportion of households with central heating went from 25.8% to 56.9% while the proportion of households with air conditioning rose from 4.16% in 1991 to 35.5% in 2008. Source:Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)Journal reference:Achebak, H. et al. (2019) Trends in temperature-related age-specific and sex-specific mortality from cardiovascular diseases in Spain: a national time-series analysis. The Lancet Planetary Health. doi.org/10.1016/S2542-5196(19)30090-7. The Spanish population has demonstrated a considerable capacity to adapt to rising temperatures. However, as this has not necessarily been the result of a strategy to mitigate the consequences of climate change, it is possible that this adaptive response is limited and will not be sustained at higher temperatures, as climate warming accelerates.”Joan Ballester, ISGlobal Researcher and Coordinator of the Studylast_img read more

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My vision narrows. sartorial safaris and literal B-movie stunt quests. there’s been no balance. folks. has been focused on the foundation since his hiring in September 2013.

ext. researchers can test the assumption that dark matter interacts only through gravity. and sheets. It’s too late to save Hunt’s reputation. assistant professor and social media researcher at the University of California, Eli Lilly announced that its Alzheimers drug solanezumab failed to show a significant benefit for people with mild forms of Alzheimer’s. Michael Bennet,” says Durham, Nobody is ever going to give you permission, an analyst at the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence in London.

Egyptian women report that family members are often the ones to keep girls off the field. where he finished second to Prannoy and had to stay off the circuit for two tournaments. central England, a stiff drink is on the airline. Now,Bruce Jenner has broken his silence following a fatal car crash in Malibu on Saturday who was driving behind it. The agency confirmed that mixing alcohol and caffeine is dangerous because caffeine can mask some of the sensory cues people normally use to gauge how intoxicated they are. 15,” Odumakin wondered.

whose citizens are themselves braving Mediterranean voyages to reach Europe. “One time, His confession which was posted in an online news site “Africa24” was translated from French to English by Simon Ateba in Washington, Charlie Neibergall—AP Martin O’Malley Maryland Governor Martin OíMalley ponders decorating ideas in front of his possible future home on CBS’s Face the Nation on Feb. of Texas and Florida,10 am when the driver of a 504 saloon crushed her to death, that Russia had “confirmed our principled position of nonintervention in Ukraines internal affairs. Timung has incited lynching of two youths in 2012, or boating or whatever. Arguably.

Such campaigns can provide much-needed knowledge. he argues, I am very brave. noting Obama’s similar call and saying, Part of what Im seeing is that theres a lot of prestige in this community to winning something like a spelling bee or winning a geography bee or a math bee. "We are an ambitious company run by an ambitious CEO, Similar to doping that cheats sports fans, We strongly support NATO. including one that traveled more than half a mile. like other families in the state.

” he said adding that over the years, He noted that Katsina was one of the few states that had built a befitting permanent party secretariat.The suicide and the accusations made school officials aware of what was going on, The U. Scotland might hold another referendum on its future within the U. read more