Gov Newsom released his revised version of the states budget

first_img KUSI Newsroom, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – San Diego County’s state legislators largely praised Gov. Gavin Newsom’s revised fiscal year 2019-20 budget today for its efforts to tackle high health care and housing costs, prepare for the next economic crisis and invest in the state’s future.In January, Newsom released his first budget since becoming governor, a $209 billion fiscal plan that included a $144 billion general fund and a projected surplus of $21 billion, the state’s largest since at least 2000. The budget included $1.3 billion for housing development and $40 million to fund two full years of tuition for first-time community college students who are enrolled full-time.Newsom’s revised budget, released Thursday, ticked up to $213 billion and builds on the first spending plan by increasing funding for things like housing development and homeless assistance while adding billions to the state’s rainy day fund, which could reach as high as $16.5 billion if state revenue trends remain consistent. The revised budget also includes a slightly higher projected surplus of $21.5 billion.“The affordability crisis families face in this state is very real, and that’s why this budget tackles those challenges head-on by focusing on housing, health care, early childhood and higher education,” Newsom said.Sen. Toni Atkins, D-San Diego, lauded Newsom for the revised budget’s gains on its predecessor. Atkins, the Senate president pro-tem, also expressed confidence that the state Legislature would finalize a budget “that will make a real difference for Californians.”“The May budget revision reflects California’s fiscal strength, increases our prudent reserves, and makes important investments for the future,” Atkins said. “I am particularly pleased to see more funding for K-12 education and increases for the Earned Income Tax Credit to help even more working Californians.”But Sen. Pat Bates, R-Laguna Niguel, called the water tax and other new taxes “unfortunate, unhelpful and unnecessary,” arguing that it is unnecessary with the state’s projected surplus and will hurt residents who are already near the poverty level.Bates also railed against Newsom’s proposal to withhold gas tax funds for transportation infrastructure upgrades if cities around the state don’t build enough housing.“His insistence to hold gas tax dollars hostage from local governments unless they do what he wants proves that the gas tax increase was a bait-and-switch on voters,” Bates said. “Promises made to voters on transportation must be promises kept.”Bates allowed that the budget includes provisions worth supporting, such as assistance for low-income families and funding to modernize the state’s public schools.“Making these priorities a reality will help all Californians,” she said.Newsom’s revised budget contains $81.1 billion for education and expands family services and programs like paid family leave, allowing up to eight weeks of paid leave for each parent.The budget also includes a provision that would eliminate sales tax on diapers and tampons, a cause that Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez, D-San Diego, has championed for years. Newsom estimated the repeal would cost the state roughly $35 million, which is likely to be recouped through other tax increases and state funding within the budget.“This tax relief will go a long way in helping those young families who we know are at their most economically vulnerable,” Gonzalez said. “In California, more than 50 percent of the children born are on Medi-Cal. … We know that diapers are a necessity not only for the health of the child, they’re also required in order to drop your child off at child care.”The revised budget also includes controversial new levies and proposals such as a tax on drinking water, which would fund cleanup efforts in communities without access to potable water. Roughly one million California residents don’t have access to clean drinking water, according to Newsom.The state legislature will now begin its final negotiations with Newsom’s office over the revised budget. The final spending plan must be approved by June 15. KUSI Newsroom Gov. Newsom released his revised version of the state’s budget Posted: May 9, 2019 May 9, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News, National & International News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

CES Responded To Flipped Boat Near Jims Landing No Reported Injuries

first_imgCES Chief Dan Grimes: “We responded with an engine, two engines, and a command rig. We also contacted the Russian River Ferry and had them meet us at the landing with their boat.” CES put two rescue swimmers on the boat and went downstream roughly 500 yards South of Jim’s Landing and located the flipped boat. Grimes: “Three victims all on shore, they were wet and cold, but okay. We brought them back safely to the landing.” Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Central Emergency Services responded to a flipped over boat in the Kenai River near Jim’s Landing around 9:51 p.m., last night. According to Grimes all occupants were wearing life jackets.last_img

The Future Does Not Exist

first_imgThe point here is that as the media world changes, what seems dominant today may turn out to be yesterday’s news in short order. Remember CompuServe, AOL, etc.? I could go on, but you get the point. So while the “Reimagining the Future (While We Still Have Time)” conference provided no real visionary solutions, because that’s impossible, it did offer a mosaic of opinion and perspective, when combined into a whole, provided a good look at where the industry is now and where it needs to go. The future doesn’t exist because we haven’t built it yet.And even more important, the students at the University of Mississippi were full participants. Anyone who spent a few days with the young journalists at that conference couldn’t help coming away with a new confidence about the future of the profession. These people are bright, energetic, savvy and ready to take the reins. Here is a list of some of the student participants. I wanted to acknowledge each of them by name, because they were all so impressive.Undergraduate Journalism Students:Natalie Dickson Kirby Sage Elizabeth Pearson Alex Pence Maggie Giffin Markus Simmons Katie Williamson Ja’juan McNeil Rashell Reese Addison Dent Houston Cofield Ren Turner Nick Toce (also event photographer)Alex McDaniel (also event coordinator) That phrase was the title of one of the presentations at Samir Husni’s recent conference, called “Reimagining the Future (While We Still Have Time),” and held at the Magazine Innovation Center in Oxford, Mississippi. The presentation was made by Thomaz Souto Correa, the vice president of editorial at The Abril Group in Brazil. And while Correa discussed many things, there is a particular idea in that title worth thinking about. Perhaps the future doesn’t exist because no one, and I mean no one, knows what it’s going to look like even two years from now. Think about one of the biggest debates of the last few years—whether to charge for online content. When Steve Brill and Walter Isaacson and Rupert Murdoch and others suggested that the status quo was unsustainable, the purveyors of the conventional wisdom came down hard. The cat’s out of the bag, they said. Stop thinking like it’s 1997. Start building a business for the Google economy. There’s no other choice.Well, one thing none of those wizards thought of was how mobile apps and iPads would change the equation. Now, suddenly, there’s a path to paid content online, because there’s a significant migration away from the free Internet and in the direction of apps you have to buy. Or apps from which publishers sell subscriptions to their content. last_img read more

Wilmington OBITUARIES Week of August 11 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Here are the obituaries published on Wilmington Apple during the week of August 11, 2019:Lived In Wilmington At Time Of Passing:Phyllis (Lanzilli) Catalogna, 98Steven W. Parker, 62Doris May (Allen) Squibb, 88Previously Lived In Wilmington:Earl W. Hannibal, 80James Thayer Hastings, 84Elizabeth M. (Nolan) McNabb, 94Worked In/Volunteered In/Connected To Wilmington:Judith Elaine Sias Guertin, 76Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Earl W. Hannibal, 80In “Obituaries”Wilmington OBITUARIES (Week of August 4, 2019)In “Obituaries”Wilmington OBITUARIES (Week of August 25, 2019)In “Obituaries”last_img read more

China evokes patriotism as trade conflict with US soars

first_imgThe trade war with the United States will only make China stronger and will never bring the country to its knees, the ruling Communist Party’s People’s Daily wrote in a front-page commentary that evoked the patriotic spirit of past wars.Beijing has yet to say whether or how it will retaliate to the latest escalation in trade tensions, which saw Washington put telecoms equipment giant Huawei Technologies Co Ltd on a blacklist that will make it extremely difficult for the telecom giant to do business with US companies.The world’s two largest economies are locked in an increasingly acrimonious trade dispute that has seen them level escalating tariffs on each other’s imports in the midst of negotiations, adding to fears about risks to global growth and knocking financial markets.The United States is not sincere about wanting to resume trade talks with China and has damaged the atmosphere for negotiations with its recent moves, a state media social media account said.Without sincerity there was no point in coming for talks and nothing to talk about, Taoran Notes, a WeChat account run by the Economic Daily, said in a post late on Thursday that was re-posted by the ruling Communist Party’s official People’s Daily.China, which reported unexpectedly weak growth in retail sales and industrial output on Wednesday, also said on Friday that the impact of trade frictions on its economy was “controllable”.”(We will) fully study the impact of the additional tariffs imposed by the United States, and promptly introduce countermeasures as needed to ensure that the economy operates within a reasonable range,” Meng Wei, a spokeswoman for the National Development and Reform Committee (NDRC), told a media briefing on Friday.In Friday’s commentary, the ruling party’s official newspaper described China’s determination to protect its national interests and dignity as being as “firm as a boulder”.”The trade war can’t bring China down. It will only harden us to grow stronger,” it said.”What kind of storms have not been seen, what bumps have not experienced for China, with its more than 5,000 years of civilization? In the face of hurricanes, the nearly 1.4 billion Chinese people have confidence and stamina.”‘Wheel of Destiny’Huawei’s Hisilicon unit, which purchases US semiconductors for its parent, has been secretly developing back-up products for years in case Huawei was one day unable to obtain the advanced chips and technology it buys from the United States, its president told staff in a letter on Friday.”Today, the wheel of destiny has turned and we have arrived at this extreme and dark moment, as a super-nation ruthlessly disrupts the world’s technology and industry system,” according to the letter.Chinese state television has this week invoked a war theme, focusing on the 1950-1953 conflict between the two Koreas that saw Chinese troops back North Korea while the South was supported by the United States.On Thursday, China Central Television replaced a programme about the ongoing Asian Film and TV Week with a 1964 Chinese movie on the Korean War, “Heroic Sons and Daughters.”On Friday night, the broadcaster will screen yet another Chinese war movie classic, “Battle on Shangganling Mountain”, the scene of a large-scale battle in North Korea, according to a post on its social media account.The post received widespread approval from Chinese social media users, with one even asking when the broadcaster would air a movie on the attack on Pearl Harbor.”Defeat the American imperialists!” another wrote.last_img read more

Houston Homeowners Move Forward After Harvey And Many Face Limited Options

first_img 00:00 /02:57 Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Allison LeeMonica Augusta, 47, says this is the second time her home has been flooded.Officials have estimated that Harvey’s floodwaters have destroyed 30,000 to 40,000 Houston homes. And as the city recovers, the people who lived in those homes are asking, “Now what?”Monica Augusta lives in the neighborhood of Bellaire, in southwest Houston. The houses on her block are surrounded by what seems like a graveyard of flood-damaged mattresses, furniture, and personal items.This is the second time her home has flooded, and she said it doesn’t get any easier.“It feels like everyone I talk to, and the more questions I ask, and different answers I get, the more overwhelmed and confused I feel,” she said. “I don’t want to go through this again. A single mom with two kids and two dogs. I can’t go through it again. But, when you have a mortgage that’s already overwhelming, how do you even begin to think of adding to that mortgage?”– / 3Many people around Houston are facing that same exact dilemma, and are reaching out to people like Sam Craven.Craven is the co-founder of Senna House Buyers, in the Heights. Since Harvey, he said he’s been having seven appointments a day; and has racked up over 200 miles on his car within three days, just to get to them.Credit: Allison LeeSam Craven, 32, drives to multiple Senna House Buyers’ clients a day, all across Houston.“Most of the people that I’ve met with have been in the hardest hit areas; the ones that have been hit multiple times. And so, they’ve kind of been through it before,” said Craven.“We have so many people calling us right now, who don’t even know what the next step is. From people calling us saying, ‘Hey, I don’t know how to dry out my house,’ to people calling us crying and upset because they’ve lost everything and they just want to move on and sell their home,” said Craven. “We find ourselves as an unfortunate subject matter expert, here.”Craven said he’s also concerned about insurance adjusters potentially moving their attention from Harvey, to Irma.Credit: Allison LeeSam Craven meets with homeowner Monica Augusta, to calculate how much it would cost to fix damages from Harvey, and how much his business can offer her for the house.And as flood victims continue to navigate through the process, Bellaire homeowner Monica Augusta said the cycle is overwhelming.“You take whatever money you can, make it livable, and move back in. Only to go through it again. Because you don’t have any other options, and I’m feeling that,” she said. “So, part of me thinks, ‘How could you ever go through this more than two, three times. But then I realize you just don’t have options….So maybe we rent the rest of our lives? I don’t know. We’re going to an apartment in [West University Place]. But even that’s terrifying, because now you have rent and a mortgage.”Over the years, Harris County has bought out more flooded homeowners than any county in the country. But the process can take years. And now, FEMA officials are telling the Houston Chronicle they’re trying to find ways to speed up the process, so flooded homeowners can consider buyouts instead of rebuilding. X Sharelast_img read more

Anthony Jeselnik Sets Comedy Central Series and Podcast in Multiplatform Pact

first_img ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 Popular on Variety The new pact also covers Jeselnik’s gig as a judge on the upcoming season of “Jeff Ross Presents Roast Battle.”“Anthony’s sardonic humor and critical eye are a big part of what makes him such an incredible comedian,” said Sarah Babineau and Jonas Larsen, Comedy Central’s exec VPs and co-heads of talent and development. “Those attributes are also why he’s a perfect fit for the host’s chair in his own series, the ‘Roast Battle’ judge’s chair, and the podcast booth.”center_img Comedian Anthony Jeselnik is set to host a new Comedy Central series and launch a podcast under a multiplatform development pact with the Viacom cabler.The deal calls for Jeselnik to host an untitled half-hour series that will mine the cabler’s vast library of standup material as a “springboard for conversation, insight and humor with well-known comics.” Comedy Central has ordered six episodes. The former writer for NBC’s “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” previously worked with Comedy Central as host of “The Jeselnik Offensive,” which ran two seasons. He also toplined the 2013 standup special “Caligula.” Jeselnik will co-host the podcast with his longtime friend, NFL Network analyst Gregg Rosenthal. “The Jeselnik and Rosenthal Vanity Project” will focus on the pair’s interest in pro football. The podcast will bow Sept. 11 as part of Comedy Central’s Global Podcast Network and incorporate digital video elements for the cabler’s social media platforms.last_img read more

Lawmakers New state education board LGBTQ policy erodes parental rights

first_img23Mar Lawmakers: New state education board LGBTQ policy erodes parental rights Categories: Glenn News Concerned parents, public not told of potential changesA group of House lawmakers today condemned a draft policy initiative by the Michigan State Board of Education that could allow students to use any school restroom they choose and allow male students to try out for girls’ sports teams, all while keeping parents in the dark about their children’s everyday activities.“As the parent of a 15-year-old daughter I am outraged at the Michigan Board of Education. This policy is evidence of a government bureaucracy run amok and goes well beyond their scope of educating our children,” said Rep. Lana Theis, R-Brighton. “The board has no business trying to take away parental rights, and this ill-conceived policy would put the health and safety of our children at risk.”Rep. Gary Glenn, R-Midland, said: “This outrageous policy forcing K-12 girls to share their bathrooms, locker rooms, or showers with boys—and hide that bizarre, radical practice from parents—not only violates parental rights but threatens the privacy, security, and comfort of our public school students.“The state board should drop such attempts at radical left-wing schemes and focus its resources and staff time on actually educating students.”The Michigan Board of Education has proposed a State Board of Education “Statement and Guidance on Safe and Supportive Learning Environments for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning Students” that the board is expected to vote on at its May 10 meeting. Public comments are being accepted on the proposal through Monday, April 11.“We strongly encourage all parents and residents of Michigan take time to submit their thoughts to the state board for review,” said Rep. Theis. “It is imperative for parents to let the board know this policy is unacceptable and encourage the board members to reject the proposal.”The board proposes six additional recommendations for schools, which include:Recognizing students by chosen names and corresponding pronouns;Using chosen names on unofficial student records, such as class/team rosters, yearbook and school newspapers/newsletters;Using case-by-case determinations for locker room options;Ensuring school dress codes are gender-neutral without restrictions based on gender identity; andEvaluating all gender-based programs and maintaining only those with clear educational purposes.“As a parent and former foster parent I am committed to protecting my teenage daughter’s safety and privacy,” said Rep. Jim Runestad, R-White Lake. “For safety purposes in public bathrooms, gender should be clearly defined as biological. These considerations are not relevant to career preparation and should not interfere with other children’s privacy rights.”State Rep. Thomas Hooker said: “The American College of Pediatricians recently said that, ‘Conditioning children into believing a lifetime of chemical and surgical impersonation of the opposite sex is normal and healthful is child abuse.’ I, for one, want the MDE’s budget zeroed out until this guidance policy is revoked and an apology issued.”The public can read the draft guidance policy and provide public comment online at the SBE website, www.everyvoicecountsmi.org, or fax public comments to 517-373-1233.Questions and concerns also can be sent to individual legislators at:Lana Theis, 42nd District, LanaTheis@house.mi.govThomas Hooker, 77th District, ThomasHooker@house.mi.govGary Glenn, 98th District, GaryGlenn@house.mi.govJim Runestad, 44th District, JimRunestad@house.mi.govLee Chatfield, 107th District, LeeChatfield@house.mi.govRay Franz, 101st District, RayFranz@house.mi.gov#####last_img read more