Atlantic Medias Quartz Hits 840k Uniques in First Month

first_imgJust over a month after it launched, Atlantic Media’s international business news site Quartz is reporting it attracted just over 800,000 unique visitors in October. Other audience metrics are already tracking similarly to established digital brands in Atlantic Media’s portfolio, a factor that’s hitting an encouraging note for the startup. Traffic expectations for the early days of the site’s performance were based partly on internal analogs like Atlantic Wire (launched in 2009) and Atlantic Cities (launched in 2011) and partly on gut instinct, but publisher Jay Lauf says results handily beat their 500,000 unique visitor benchmark for month one. “There’s some gut guesswork involved,” says Lauf, “but I think in this case we looked at a combination of our understanding of traffic growth on Atlantic Wire and Atlantic Cities and then the kind of market place Quartz is going after—a defined market of global business leaders. And the fact that we are in a new climate where digital brands can grow quickly if they take advantage of the digital jet stream. Plus, we thought social could really push us to faster growth.” Side-door traffic has so far worked in the site’s favor. Social referrals accounted for 40 percent of Quartz’s traffic in October. By comparison, TheAtlantic.com‘s social referral traffic is in the 30 percent range, a factor that Lauf says bodes well for the so-far less established Quartz. Lauf also believes that high social percentage is what helped drive international traffic—40 percent of October’s uniques were from outside the U.S. That metric was predicted accurately, he says. Launch sponsors were given a 60/40 ratio between domestic and international traffic during the site’s roll-out phase.Thirty percent of Quartz’s traffic came from mobile devices, which again is in line with or higher than other established media properties. Twenty-five percent of The Atlantic’s traffic arrives there via mobile, for example. Despite being built as a mobile-first destination, Lauf says it’s harder to gauge traffic expectations for the platform—”There’s not a huge raft of information on that.”Going forward, Lauf says expectations are to hit 2.5 million to 3 million monthly uniques by the end of next year.last_img read more

Scientists 3Dprint human skin and bone for Mars astronauts

first_img Tags The skin sample was printed using human blood plasma as a “bio ink.” The researchers added plant and algae-based materials to increase the viscosity so it wouldn’t just fly everywhere in low gravity. “Producing the bone sample involved printing human stem cells with a similar bio-ink composition, with the addition of a calcium phosphate bone cement as a structure-supporting material, which is subsequently absorbed during the growth phase,” said Nieves Cubo, a bioprinting specialist at the university. Enlarge ImageThis bioprinted bone sample was made with human stem cells, blood plasma and bone cement. ESA/SJM Photography Imagine walking up to a Star Trek replicator and ordering a bone graft instead of tea, Earl Grey, hot. We’re heading in that direction. The European Space Agency’s 3D Printing of Living Tissue for Space Exploration project aims to print human tissue to help injured astronauts heal when they’re far, far away from Earth.Scientists from the University Hospital of Dresden Technical University in Germany bio-printed skin and bone samples upside down to help determine if the method could be used in a low-gravity environment. It worked. ESA released videos of the printing in action. 14 Photos Share your voice Some of the raw materials, such as blood plasma, would come from the astronauts’ own bodies to protect against transplant rejection. ESA’s project is already looking ahead to adapting the 3D printing of entire organs to space conditions. Just this year we’ve seen advances in printing a tiny heart from human tissue and a breathing lung air sac. These samples are just the first steps for the ESA’s ambitious 3D bio-printing project, which is investigating what it would take to equip astronauts with medical and surgical facilities to help them survive and treat injuries on long spaceflights and on Mars.”Carrying enough medical supplies for all possible eventualities would be impossible in the limited space and mass of a spacecraft,” said Tommaso Ghidini, head of ESA’s Structures, Mechanisms and Materials Division. “Instead, a 3D bioprinting capability will let them respond to medical emergencies as they arise.” Dying space missions remembered in inspiring final imagescenter_img Sci-Tech Post a comment 3D-printing advancements Watch this wild 3D-printed lung air sac breathe Here’s the first 3D-printed heart made from actual human tissue 0 3D printing Spacelast_img read more