MercedesBenz CLA Shooting Brake puts junk back in the trunk

first_img See All • reading • Mercedes-Benz CLA Shooting Brake puts junk back in the trunk More about 2019 Mercedes-Benz A220 Review • 2019 Mercedes-Benz A220 review: Raising the entry-level bar 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLE450 review: More luxurious and techy than ever Mar 7 • New Peugeot 208 debuts i-Cockpit with 3D HUD Combo dashboard Mar 7 • The Ferrari F8 Tributo is the last of the nonhybrid V8s 86 Photos Mercedes-Benz Mercedes-Benz CLA Shooting Brake adds function to form More From Roadshow Comment Tags Preview • 2019 Mercedes-Benz A220 Sedan: A class above The Mercedes-Benz CLA-Class is an A-Class that’s been chopped up to add style at the cost of capacity. But what if you want some style and cargo room simultaneously? You could get a regular A-Class hatchback, sure, or you could opt for the new CLA Shooting Brake.Mercedes-Benz on Tuesday unveiled the CLA-Class Shooting Brake at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show. Just like the last CLA Shooting Brake, this one builds on the style of the CLA-Class with an extra dose of wagon at the back for added versatility.In terms of looks, it’s pretty darn close to the new CLA-Class. The headlights are on the more angular side, the side is largely free of character lines while the rear end relies on the same “coupe” taillights seen on the CLA and CLS. The Shooting Brake’s wagon-ish rear end packs an aggressive taper that helps separate it from the A-Class Hatchback. Its 0.26 drag coefficient is a little less slippery than the CLA-Class (0.23), but not by much.Enlarge ImageAs far as quasi-wagons go, this one’s a looker. Andrew Hoyle/Roadshow The interior is almost a carbon copy of the CLA, with both its screens slapped onto the same “surfboard” piece of glass. There’s ample storage space ahead of the redesigned touchpad controller. If you’ve seen the A-Class or the CLA-Class, the story is pretty much the same here. The centerpiece of the CLA Shooting Brake’s tech is MBUX, Mercedes-Benz’s latest and greatest infotainment system. Like the A-Class and CLA-Class (again), MBUX packs a digital assistant with natural language processing, and the system itself is vastly more responsive and capable than the outgoing COMAND system. It also packs a suite of active and passive driver aids that allow the vehicle to hold itself in a lane on the highway, but it can also change lanes automatically after the driver applies the turn signal.In Europe, the CLA Shooting Brake will be offered with a variety of gas and diesel engines. Both manual and dual-clutch transmissions will be available, and buyers will have a choice of two or four driven wheels. The CLA Shooting Brake goes on sale in Europe in September and, as with the previous iteration, it’s unlikely we’ll ever see it in the US. Heck, we don’t even get the A-Class Hatchback. Share your voice Geneva Motor Show 2019 Mercedes-Benz 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLS-Class first drive: ‘The S-Class of SUVs’ earns its title 2019 Mercedes-AMG G63 review: Loud and proud, and absolutely divine Wagons Hatchbacks Apr 17 • The 2020 Jaguar XE gets its first major visual refresh Geneva Motor Show 2019 1 Mar 8 • VW is still ‘100 percent’ investigating a pickup truck for the USlast_img read more

Houston Homeowners Move Forward After Harvey And Many Face Limited Options

first_img 00:00 /02:57 Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Allison LeeMonica Augusta, 47, says this is the second time her home has been flooded.Officials have estimated that Harvey’s floodwaters have destroyed 30,000 to 40,000 Houston homes. And as the city recovers, the people who lived in those homes are asking, “Now what?”Monica Augusta lives in the neighborhood of Bellaire, in southwest Houston. The houses on her block are surrounded by what seems like a graveyard of flood-damaged mattresses, furniture, and personal items.This is the second time her home has flooded, and she said it doesn’t get any easier.“It feels like everyone I talk to, and the more questions I ask, and different answers I get, the more overwhelmed and confused I feel,” she said. “I don’t want to go through this again. A single mom with two kids and two dogs. I can’t go through it again. But, when you have a mortgage that’s already overwhelming, how do you even begin to think of adding to that mortgage?”– / 3Many people around Houston are facing that same exact dilemma, and are reaching out to people like Sam Craven.Craven is the co-founder of Senna House Buyers, in the Heights. Since Harvey, he said he’s been having seven appointments a day; and has racked up over 200 miles on his car within three days, just to get to them.Credit: Allison LeeSam Craven, 32, drives to multiple Senna House Buyers’ clients a day, all across Houston.“Most of the people that I’ve met with have been in the hardest hit areas; the ones that have been hit multiple times. And so, they’ve kind of been through it before,” said Craven.“We have so many people calling us right now, who don’t even know what the next step is. From people calling us saying, ‘Hey, I don’t know how to dry out my house,’ to people calling us crying and upset because they’ve lost everything and they just want to move on and sell their home,” said Craven. “We find ourselves as an unfortunate subject matter expert, here.”Craven said he’s also concerned about insurance adjusters potentially moving their attention from Harvey, to Irma.Credit: Allison LeeSam Craven meets with homeowner Monica Augusta, to calculate how much it would cost to fix damages from Harvey, and how much his business can offer her for the house.And as flood victims continue to navigate through the process, Bellaire homeowner Monica Augusta said the cycle is overwhelming.“You take whatever money you can, make it livable, and move back in. Only to go through it again. Because you don’t have any other options, and I’m feeling that,” she said. “So, part of me thinks, ‘How could you ever go through this more than two, three times. But then I realize you just don’t have options….So maybe we rent the rest of our lives? I don’t know. We’re going to an apartment in [West University Place]. But even that’s terrifying, because now you have rent and a mortgage.”Over the years, Harris County has bought out more flooded homeowners than any county in the country. But the process can take years. And now, FEMA officials are telling the Houston Chronicle they’re trying to find ways to speed up the process, so flooded homeowners can consider buyouts instead of rebuilding. X Sharelast_img read more

Create CardFree Rewards Programs with Apps

first_img Cardboard punch cards and laminated key-ring tags are so yesteryear. This batch of apps allows customers to ditch the cards and keep track of their loyalty and purchase-based rewards programs on their smartphones. If your business has such programs in place, take a look at how these apps can help you manage them.CaptureCode: Merchant functions of this sales-tracking app integrate with social media and many point-of-sale systems to help you get more customers and track their buying habits. Using that information, promotions can then be tailored to individuals specifically. Available for iPhone and Android. 2 min read CardStar: Aggregate offers and track sales habits of individuals. A simple online sign-up gives customers access to information about your business, including contacts, store locators and mobile coupons. Design incentive programs and communicate information that’s important to consumers, like product recalls. Available for iPhone, Android, BlackBerry and some Windows and Nokia phones. Key Ring: With this app, customers scan all their cards into their smartphones and sync cards among family members, and merchants customize offers and promotions to users. Consumers can join the Key Ring Rx Savings program for discounts on prescription drugs. The free app is available for iPhone, Android, Windows 7 and BlackBerry. October 7, 2011 Register Now » Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global This story appears in the October 2011 issue of . Subscribe »last_img read more

Forget Beacons The Future of Retail May Be Magnetic

first_img Did you know your local mall has its own unique magnetic signature? It does — and in the future, it could help inform the way you shop.On Monday, IndoorAtlas unveiled a new technology that should make it more convenient for shoppers to find what they’re looking for when they visit a mall. Rather than merely indicating where a store is situated in an indoor shopping setting, the technology can pinpoint exactly where a product category, such as men’s shirts, is located. The tech can also be used to find specific brands.A building’s magnetic signature is determined by “how much steel and metal is in the building” as well as how it’s constructed, Aaron Liao, IndoorAtlas’s director of developer evangelism, told Entrepreneur during a demo of the company’s mobile app. Every building will be different based on how it was built and where it’s located.Related: This Gadget Makes Your Entire Kitchen ‘Smart’Whereas beacon technology requires installation, IndoorAtlas uses your phone’s built-in compass sensors to track the signals produced by a building’s steel girders. Using this magnetic map, your phone is able to figure out where you are in the building and direct you to what you’re looking for. This means there’s no need for retailers to maintain any hardware (beacons, like all electronics, eventually run out of battery power), and shoppers end up with an accurate idea of where products and brands are located.“You can say to it ‘Find me men’s shorts’ and I can give you turn-by-turn walking directions to every instance of men’s shirts, whether they are inside Bloomingdales, Abercrombie and Fitch, or Nordstrom,” says Liao. “It’s amazingly accurate. We boast one meter of accuracy, which is effectively the difference between leading you to men’s button-down shirts and the casual t-shirts that are right next to them. Three feet of accuracy means I can lead you directly to the soap versus the shampoo that’s right next to it.”Image Credit: Indoor Atlas | 10 Face | Shutterstock.com | Enhanced by EntrepreneurThe only issue: all data needs to be manually added into the app. In other words, before IndoorAtlas can direct shoppers’ to the men’s shirts aisle in a store, someone must first manually input the correct location information into the app. Right now, the company is handling the mapping side of things on its own, but the hope is to ultimately crowdsource the data, and operate in a similar fashion to Waze, an app through which users share real-time traffic and road information.Related: Samsung Announces Artik, a New Platform to Advance Its Open ‘Internet of Things’ PlanThe goal is that once enough people begin using the IndoorAtlas app, they will organically update the data themselves, says Liao. So, just as if you were reporting an accident on Waze, if you’re looking for socks and realize they’ve been moved across the store floor, you might update the app to reflect the change so others don’t have the same problem.Liao says the company also hopes to partner with retailers, who would update the app whenever they reorganize the store floor. They’d also be able to offer deals and coupons that will show up on consumers’ phones when they’re shopping nearby.A trial of tech is currently underway in San Francisco at the Westfield Mall on Market Street. Westfield is the first location in the United States to try out the tech, but it’s already being used in some retail locations overseas.Beyond finding things to buy, the app can be used to find people. If you and a friend are shopping together and happen to lose each other, you can opt to share your location with your buddy and get turn-by-turn directions to his or her whereabouts.It certainly could make shopping, especially in larger malls like Mall of America, a lot less of a headache.Related: Everything Business Owners Need to Know About Beacons 4 min read August 24, 2015 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now »last_img read more