The Future Does Not Exist

first_imgThe point here is that as the media world changes, what seems dominant today may turn out to be yesterday’s news in short order. Remember CompuServe, AOL, etc.? I could go on, but you get the point. So while the “Reimagining the Future (While We Still Have Time)” conference provided no real visionary solutions, because that’s impossible, it did offer a mosaic of opinion and perspective, when combined into a whole, provided a good look at where the industry is now and where it needs to go. The future doesn’t exist because we haven’t built it yet.And even more important, the students at the University of Mississippi were full participants. Anyone who spent a few days with the young journalists at that conference couldn’t help coming away with a new confidence about the future of the profession. These people are bright, energetic, savvy and ready to take the reins. Here is a list of some of the student participants. I wanted to acknowledge each of them by name, because they were all so impressive.Undergraduate Journalism Students:Natalie Dickson Kirby Sage Elizabeth Pearson Alex Pence Maggie Giffin Markus Simmons Katie Williamson Ja’juan McNeil Rashell Reese Addison Dent Houston Cofield Ren Turner Nick Toce (also event photographer)Alex McDaniel (also event coordinator) That phrase was the title of one of the presentations at Samir Husni’s recent conference, called “Reimagining the Future (While We Still Have Time),” and held at the Magazine Innovation Center in Oxford, Mississippi. The presentation was made by Thomaz Souto Correa, the vice president of editorial at The Abril Group in Brazil. And while Correa discussed many things, there is a particular idea in that title worth thinking about. Perhaps the future doesn’t exist because no one, and I mean no one, knows what it’s going to look like even two years from now. Think about one of the biggest debates of the last few years—whether to charge for online content. When Steve Brill and Walter Isaacson and Rupert Murdoch and others suggested that the status quo was unsustainable, the purveyors of the conventional wisdom came down hard. The cat’s out of the bag, they said. Stop thinking like it’s 1997. Start building a business for the Google economy. There’s no other choice.Well, one thing none of those wizards thought of was how mobile apps and iPads would change the equation. Now, suddenly, there’s a path to paid content online, because there’s a significant migration away from the free Internet and in the direction of apps you have to buy. Or apps from which publishers sell subscriptions to their content. last_img read more

MercedesBenz CLA Shooting Brake puts junk back in the trunk

first_img See All • reading • Mercedes-Benz CLA Shooting Brake puts junk back in the trunk More about 2019 Mercedes-Benz A220 Review • 2019 Mercedes-Benz A220 review: Raising the entry-level bar 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLE450 review: More luxurious and techy than ever Mar 7 • New Peugeot 208 debuts i-Cockpit with 3D HUD Combo dashboard Mar 7 • The Ferrari F8 Tributo is the last of the nonhybrid V8s 86 Photos Mercedes-Benz Mercedes-Benz CLA Shooting Brake adds function to form More From Roadshow Comment Tags Preview • 2019 Mercedes-Benz A220 Sedan: A class above The Mercedes-Benz CLA-Class is an A-Class that’s been chopped up to add style at the cost of capacity. But what if you want some style and cargo room simultaneously? You could get a regular A-Class hatchback, sure, or you could opt for the new CLA Shooting Brake.Mercedes-Benz on Tuesday unveiled the CLA-Class Shooting Brake at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show. Just like the last CLA Shooting Brake, this one builds on the style of the CLA-Class with an extra dose of wagon at the back for added versatility.In terms of looks, it’s pretty darn close to the new CLA-Class. The headlights are on the more angular side, the side is largely free of character lines while the rear end relies on the same “coupe” taillights seen on the CLA and CLS. The Shooting Brake’s wagon-ish rear end packs an aggressive taper that helps separate it from the A-Class Hatchback. Its 0.26 drag coefficient is a little less slippery than the CLA-Class (0.23), but not by much.Enlarge ImageAs far as quasi-wagons go, this one’s a looker. Andrew Hoyle/Roadshow The interior is almost a carbon copy of the CLA, with both its screens slapped onto the same “surfboard” piece of glass. There’s ample storage space ahead of the redesigned touchpad controller. If you’ve seen the A-Class or the CLA-Class, the story is pretty much the same here. The centerpiece of the CLA Shooting Brake’s tech is MBUX, Mercedes-Benz’s latest and greatest infotainment system. Like the A-Class and CLA-Class (again), MBUX packs a digital assistant with natural language processing, and the system itself is vastly more responsive and capable than the outgoing COMAND system. It also packs a suite of active and passive driver aids that allow the vehicle to hold itself in a lane on the highway, but it can also change lanes automatically after the driver applies the turn signal.In Europe, the CLA Shooting Brake will be offered with a variety of gas and diesel engines. Both manual and dual-clutch transmissions will be available, and buyers will have a choice of two or four driven wheels. The CLA Shooting Brake goes on sale in Europe in September and, as with the previous iteration, it’s unlikely we’ll ever see it in the US. Heck, we don’t even get the A-Class Hatchback. Share your voice Geneva Motor Show 2019 Mercedes-Benz 2020 Mercedes-Benz GLS-Class first drive: ‘The S-Class of SUVs’ earns its title 2019 Mercedes-AMG G63 review: Loud and proud, and absolutely divine Wagons Hatchbacks Apr 17 • The 2020 Jaguar XE gets its first major visual refresh Geneva Motor Show 2019 1 Mar 8 • VW is still ‘100 percent’ investigating a pickup truck for the USlast_img read more