The Future Does Not Exist

first_imgThe point here is that as the media world changes, what seems dominant today may turn out to be yesterday’s news in short order. Remember CompuServe, AOL, etc.? I could go on, but you get the point. So while the “Reimagining the Future (While We Still Have Time)” conference provided no real visionary solutions, because that’s impossible, it did offer a mosaic of opinion and perspective, when combined into a whole, provided a good look at where the industry is now and where it needs to go. The future doesn’t exist because we haven’t built it yet.And even more important, the students at the University of Mississippi were full participants. Anyone who spent a few days with the young journalists at that conference couldn’t help coming away with a new confidence about the future of the profession. These people are bright, energetic, savvy and ready to take the reins. Here is a list of some of the student participants. I wanted to acknowledge each of them by name, because they were all so impressive.Undergraduate Journalism Students:Natalie Dickson Kirby Sage Elizabeth Pearson Alex Pence Maggie Giffin Markus Simmons Katie Williamson Ja’juan McNeil Rashell Reese Addison Dent Houston Cofield Ren Turner Nick Toce (also event photographer)Alex McDaniel (also event coordinator) That phrase was the title of one of the presentations at Samir Husni’s recent conference, called “Reimagining the Future (While We Still Have Time),” and held at the Magazine Innovation Center in Oxford, Mississippi. The presentation was made by Thomaz Souto Correa, the vice president of editorial at The Abril Group in Brazil. And while Correa discussed many things, there is a particular idea in that title worth thinking about. Perhaps the future doesn’t exist because no one, and I mean no one, knows what it’s going to look like even two years from now. Think about one of the biggest debates of the last few years—whether to charge for online content. When Steve Brill and Walter Isaacson and Rupert Murdoch and others suggested that the status quo was unsustainable, the purveyors of the conventional wisdom came down hard. The cat’s out of the bag, they said. Stop thinking like it’s 1997. Start building a business for the Google economy. There’s no other choice.Well, one thing none of those wizards thought of was how mobile apps and iPads would change the equation. Now, suddenly, there’s a path to paid content online, because there’s a significant migration away from the free Internet and in the direction of apps you have to buy. Or apps from which publishers sell subscriptions to their content. last_img read more

Scientists 3Dprint human skin and bone for Mars astronauts

first_img Tags The skin sample was printed using human blood plasma as a “bio ink.” The researchers added plant and algae-based materials to increase the viscosity so it wouldn’t just fly everywhere in low gravity. “Producing the bone sample involved printing human stem cells with a similar bio-ink composition, with the addition of a calcium phosphate bone cement as a structure-supporting material, which is subsequently absorbed during the growth phase,” said Nieves Cubo, a bioprinting specialist at the university. Enlarge ImageThis bioprinted bone sample was made with human stem cells, blood plasma and bone cement. ESA/SJM Photography Imagine walking up to a Star Trek replicator and ordering a bone graft instead of tea, Earl Grey, hot. We’re heading in that direction. The European Space Agency’s 3D Printing of Living Tissue for Space Exploration project aims to print human tissue to help injured astronauts heal when they’re far, far away from Earth.Scientists from the University Hospital of Dresden Technical University in Germany bio-printed skin and bone samples upside down to help determine if the method could be used in a low-gravity environment. It worked. ESA released videos of the printing in action. 14 Photos Share your voice Some of the raw materials, such as blood plasma, would come from the astronauts’ own bodies to protect against transplant rejection. ESA’s project is already looking ahead to adapting the 3D printing of entire organs to space conditions. Just this year we’ve seen advances in printing a tiny heart from human tissue and a breathing lung air sac. These samples are just the first steps for the ESA’s ambitious 3D bio-printing project, which is investigating what it would take to equip astronauts with medical and surgical facilities to help them survive and treat injuries on long spaceflights and on Mars.”Carrying enough medical supplies for all possible eventualities would be impossible in the limited space and mass of a spacecraft,” said Tommaso Ghidini, head of ESA’s Structures, Mechanisms and Materials Division. “Instead, a 3D bioprinting capability will let them respond to medical emergencies as they arise.” Dying space missions remembered in inspiring final imagescenter_img Sci-Tech Post a comment 3D-printing advancements Watch this wild 3D-printed lung air sac breathe Here’s the first 3D-printed heart made from actual human tissue 0 3D printing Spacelast_img read more

Bangladesh cant bear burden of Rohingyas for long Khaleda

first_imgBNP chairperson and former prime minister Khaleda Zia holds a Rohingya child in her arms while visiting Rohingya camp in Balukhali of Ukhia, Cox’s Bazar. Photo: BNP Bangladesh Nationalist Party chairperson Khaleda Zia on Monday urged the government and international community to intensify diplomatic efforts to resolve the Rohingya crisis, reports UNB.She made the call while talking to newsmen after distributing relief materials among displaced Rohingyas at Moynargona Rohingya camp in Ukhiya.The BNP chief also urged Myanmar to take back its nationals ensuring their security and citizenship for the sake of humanity.”We think the Rohingya crisis won’t be resolved only by distributing relief materials. The Rohingyas will have to be repatriated through discussions and strong diplomatic efforts so that they can live their own country with security and without fear,” she said.Mentioning that the government could not yet take any effective step to resolve the Rohingya problem, Khaleda said, “The Bangladesh government must strengthen its diplomatic efforts to send back the Rohingyas. Alongside, the international organisations will have to take responsibility for repatriating them on humanitarian ground.”The BNP chief called upon the international community to come forward to ensure the safe return of Rohingyas to their own country. “I appeal to the international organizations: You please translate your words into actions to overcome the problem.”Khaleda said the international community should understand Bangladesh is a poor, small and densely populated country. “Though we’re poor, we have got the big heart and we love people. That’s way locals are making their best efforts and providing money from their pockets to ease the pains and sufferings of the Rohingyas.She further said, “But it’s not possible for us to bear it for a long time. So, Myanmar should take steps to take their citizens back to their country as early as possible as winter is approaching fast as the rainy season is over.”Khaleda Zia arrived at Ukhia around 1:00pm to visit four Rohingya camps and a medical camp set up by pro-BNP physicians’ body, Doctors’ Association of Bangladesh (DAB). She will return to Chittagong later in the evening.last_img read more

Modi Gandhi duel in Indian state election

first_imgA voter marks her ballot at a polling booth for India`s Madhya Pradesh state assembly election in Bhopal on 28 November 2018. Millions of Indians began voting on 28 November for a key state election seen as a direct fight between prime minister Narendra Modi and his lead rival ahead of the national vote. Photo: AFPMillions of Indians voted Wednesday in a state election seen as a key duel between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his main rival before the whole country goes to the polls in 2019.Modi’s right-wing Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) has governed the central state of Madhya Pradesh, home to 73 million people, since 2003 having won three state elections in a row.But polls suggest that the opposition Congress headed by Rahul Gandhi, scion of the Gandhi-Nehru dynasty, could win on the back of concerns about rising unemployment and by appealing to disgruntled farmers.The party, which lost power in Madhya Pradesh in 2003 — and nationally to Modi in 2014 — has campaigned aggressively against three-time chief minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan on issues of corruption and misgovernance.Chouhan, who lead the BJP to a thumping majority in the 2013 elections, has nevertheless sounded confident. Modi himself has addressed no fewer than 10 rallies in the state in a hard-fought campaign.”This is not the toughest election of my career, it’s very comfortable,” Chouhan told reporters after casting his vote.The vote is one of five state elections this month and next that are a litmus test of Modi’s popularity ahead of general elections that have to take place before May but for which no date has been announced yet.Nearly 800,000 voters were also entitled to vote on Wednesday in the remote northeast state of Mizoram, which is governed by Congress. Results from all the state elections are due on 11 December.The BJP is trying hard to maintain its winning momentum after defeating Congress in at least a dozen states since the 2014 national election victory, and has campaigned hard in Madhya Pradesh.An electoral defeat in the state would be a major setback for the party and dent the winning image of Modi, 68.The state, one of India’s poorest and which is highly dependent on agriculture, is also crucial for his rival Gandhi.The 48-year-old is projected as party’s prime ministerial candidate but has so far failed to deliver any impressive electoral wins.last_img

Tonight AFROs First Edition with Sean Yoes Monday August 17

first_imgListen at WEAA Live Stream: http://amber.streamguys.com.4020/live.m3uNational politics with political commentators Catalina Byrd and Sean Breeze, including Trump’s dubious policy positions and more hand wringing by Clinton supporters over, “email gate.” And we’ll talk local politics with Byrd and Stephen Janis of The Real News Network, including Gov. Larry Hogan’s alleged war on Baltimore and City Council President Jack Young’s proposal to sell the city-owned Hilton Hotel, in order to build recreation centers. It’s all coming up this evening on AFRO’s First Edition with Sean Yoes.last_img