Scientists say the American lion is not a lion after all

first_img Explore further Panthera atrox skull. Image credit: Wikipedia. More information: Per Christiansen and John M. Harris, Craniomandibular Morphology and Phylogenetic Affinities of Panthera atrox: Implications for the Evolution and Paleobiology of the Lion Lineage, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 29(3):934-945. 2009. doi:10.1671/039.029.0314 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Male sabertoothed cats were pussycats compared to macho lions © 2010 PhysOrg.com The best preserved fossils of Panthera atrox have been found in the La Brea tar pits in Los Angeles and are mostly housed in the University of California Museum of Paleontology. Over the last 40,000 years the tar pits have trapped and preserved many animals in the thick asphalt deposits, because they were attracted to water that often covered and concealed the asphalt. Around 90 percent of the large animals found in La Brea were carnivores, presumably attracted to the area by the animals trapped in the sticky asphalt, and then becoming trapped themselves. The largest of the cat family found in the tar pits is the Panthera atrox.The new study, by Per Christiansen of the Zoological Museum in Copenhagen, Denmark, and John Harris of the George C. Page Museum in Los Angeles in the U.S. used a range of statistical and shape analysis methods to compare large numbers of skulls of modern and extinct pantherine cats. They analyzed 23 dimensions on the skulls and found P. atrox has some similarities to lions but also many differences. The mandibular morphology is closer to jaguars and tigers than to lions. The researchers concluded that P. atrox was evolved from a line of cats that immigrated into the Americas in the mid Pleistocene, and which gave rise in the late Pleistocene to P. atrox and the jaguar.Panthera atrox was one of the largest cats ever, weighing in at over 350 kg and attacking prey animals as large as the wild horse and bison. It is believed to have inhabited open habitats, like the largest individuals of the modern jaguar, and became extinct around 10-12,000 years ago. At its height the American lion ranged from Alaska and the Yukon to Mexico.The paper was published in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. (PhysOrg.com) — There has been some debate over the last century or so about whether the extinct American lion, Panthera atrox, which dates from the Pleistocene, is related to present day African lions (Panthera leo) or to the jaguar (Panthera onca). Most paleontologists consider P. atrox as a lion, and have in the past even classified the American lion as Panthera leo rather than a separate species. Now a new study has challenged previous classifications and found the American lion was a distinct species and more similar to the jaguar than the lion. Citation: Scientists say the American lion is not a lion after all (2010, May 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-05-scientists-american-lion.htmllast_img read more

Quantum levitation could prevent nano systems from crashing together

first_img(Phys.org) — Since the first demonstration of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) in the mid-‘80s, the technology has not proven as useful as originally anticipated. One of the problems is that the tiny components tend to stick together due to strong surface adhesion forces on the nanoscale, an effect that engineers call “stiction.” Now in a new study, scientists suggest that this problem might be solved by inducing quantum levitation between components, which they demonstrate by simply adding a thin metallic coating to one of the interacting surfaces. Journal information: Applied Physics Letters Explore further Researchers see exotic force for first time More information: Mathias Boström, et al. “Ultrathin metallic coatings can induce quantum levitation between nanosurfaces.” Applied Physics Letters 100, 253104 (2012). DOI: 10.1063/1.4729822 By preventing stiction, quantum levitation may offer a way to prevent surfaces used in MEMS and nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) from crashing together due to other attractive van der Waals forces that exist between them. Since the thickness of the nanocoating changes the dielectric properties of the interacting surfaces, researchers would have to precisely determine the correct thickness for a desired levitation distance. If the technique works, it may provide a much needed revitalization of the fields of MEMS and NEMS.In the future, the researchers plan to extend their investigations to other materials, such as zinc oxide and hafnia, which are widely used in microelectrical and microoptical devices. They also have an upcoming paper (arxiv.org/abs/1206.4852v1) in which they investigate the repulsive and attractive forces between excited Cesium atoms that are confined in a nanochannel, which are very different from those in free space.“Two Cesium atoms that are close together and in an excited state can form unusually large molecules when they are between two gold surfaces,” explained coauthor Mathias Bostrom of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway, and Australian National University in Canberra, Australia. “The effects from retardation for these excited state interactions between atoms are very similar to what we found for the Casimir-Lifshitz force between a gold-coated silica surface and a silica surface in toluene. Hence we found long-range attraction that brings the atoms together and short-range repulsion enabling bound states (preventing the atoms from crashing together, i.e., forming super large molecules).”Finally, the researchers plan to further investigate how quantum levitation may be used for NEMS systems by looking at anisotropic effects, which are the different properties that arise when parallel or perpendicular to the material interface.“Our colleagues in Oslo (Professor Clas Persson of the University of Oslo and his team) have calculated the actual optical properties of the materials (the dielectric function) for thin gold sheets which will be used to investigate how anisotropic effects may influence NEMS systems with gold nanocoatings. It is likely that the range with repulsive forces (preventing the system from crashing together) may be influenced in such improved calculations. Our aim is to do such calculations this autumn.” Two pieces of silica – one with a gold nanocoating – will experience a repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz interaction beyond a critical distance. Without the gold nanocoating, the interaction would be attractive at the same distance. Image credit: Boström, et al. ©2012 American Institute of Physics The team of researchers, from institutions in Norway, Australia, and Sweden, has published the study on quantum levitation between nanosurfaces in a recent issue of Applied Physics Letters.The odd thing about this levitation is that it stems from the Casimir-Lifshitz force, which has the unusual property of being either attractive or repulsive. As a type of van der Waals force, it arises between nearby particles due to their inherent electrical properties. In this study, the scientists looked at the Casimir-Lifshitz force that occurs between two silica surfaces in a liquid (either bromobenzene or toluene). Normally, this force is attractive, but it weakens as the silica particles move further apart. This weakening is called retardation, and the researchers found that they could decrease the distance at which retardation occurs by coating an ultrathin layer of gold on one of the silica surfaces. This small modification shifts the retardation regime from a separation distance of several nanometers down to a few nanometers by modifying the dielectric properties of the coated silica surface. In fact, retardation weakens the attraction so much that the force becomes repulsive when the surfaces are separated by a few nanometers or more, at a critical distance called the levitation distance. Below the levitation distance, the force again becomes attractive, while above this distance it becomes increasingly repulsive up to a maximum point. At still larger distances, the repulsion stabilizes below the maximum value. The ability to control the Casimir-Lifshitz force is not completely new. Scientists have known about these effects theoretically since the 1970s, but only recent advances in nanotechnology have allowed for experimental investigations. “The interaction between two silica objects in toluene is attractive,” coauthor Bo Sernelius of Linköping University in Sweden told Phys.org. “Previous studies have shown that, if one of the objects is replaced by a solid gold object, the interaction turns repulsive for distances beyond the levitation distance. Thus there is a potential barrier that reduces the chance for the objects to come close and stick to each other. We found, and this is new, that if instead of having a solid gold object we had a silica object with a thin gold coating, the levitation distance shrunk and the barrier became higher. The chance of preventing stiction increased considerably.” Copyright 2012 Phys.org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Quantum levitation could prevent nano systems from crashing together (2012, July 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-07-quantum-levitation-nano.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Graphene paper able to behave like animated origami w video

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further The work by the team was inspired by origami, an art form based on folding paper. In this instance, the paper was instead two types of one-atom thick sheets of graphene infused with hydrogen and oxygen compounds resulting in graphene oxide and graphene oxide-polydopamine. The former does not react to water but the second does. To create origami type structures, the team infused the latter with water molecules than bonded the two types of sheets together—when heat or light was applied to the second type, it would cause the water molecules to be released, making the paper shrink slightly, which in turn would exert a force that would pull against the second type of sheet. This allowed for the creation of hinges or joints which could be employed on command, which made the objects programmable in a sense.To demonstrate the usefulness of their idea, the team bonded sheets together in such a way as to cause a box to self-form. Another example was of a sheet that formed into a worm-shaped object that was capable of inching along a surface—the team found they could cause it to turn by heating just one side of it. The third was a claw-like object that was capable of grabbing onto something else and in some instances was able to lift other small objects. Play The photoactuation behavior of the self-folding box. Credit: Donghua University The researchers believe their research could lead to the development of a wide variety of objects such as remotely controlled robots, tissue engineering or even the development of a type of artificial muscle. For their next project, they want to see if it might be possible to create similar types of objects at a much smaller scale, perhaps down to nanosize—they believe the properties and performance of such tiny objects would be different at such sizes and are eager to find out what they may be. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Play The turning behavior of the wormlike walking device driven by an IR laser. Credit: Donghua University (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Donghua University in China has found a way to cause tiny (0.8 to 6 centimeter) objects made of graphene sheets to move around in specific ways using just heat and infrared light—and it is based on origami. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes the types of graphene they used, the types of objects they created and the ways in which the objects were able to be moved. Citation: Graphene ‘paper’ able to behave like animated origami (w/ video) (2015, November 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-11-graphene-paper-animated-origami-video.html A fast self-folding box driven by light. (A) Time profiles of self-folding movements of a cross-shaped piece of paper with and without NIR light irradiation. The sample was placed on the platform and illuminated with NIR light (100 mW cm−2) normal to its surface (light is incident from above). (B) IR images of the self-folding box with and without light illumination (100 mW cm−2, NIR light). Credit: (c) 2015 Science Advances (2015). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1500533center_img Journal information: Science Advances PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Researchers find electron chirality in graphene impacts current flow Play The walking behavior of the wormlike walking device driven on and off by an NIR light on and off (100 mW cm−2). Credit: Donghua University More information: J. Mu et al. Origami-inspired active graphene-based paper for programmable instant self-folding walking devices, Science Advances (2015). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1500533 © 2015 Phys.org Play The grasping behavior of the “artificial/robotic hand” driven by light irradiation. Credit: Donghua University PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenlast_img read more

Researchers discover a blazarlike narrowline Seyfert 1 galaxy

first_imgR band SDSS image of J2118-0732. Credit: Yang et al., 2018. Explore further Researchers have identified a new blazar-like narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy that emits gamma-ray radiation. The new galaxy, designated SDSS J211852.96−073227.5, could offer insights into formation and evolution of jets of radiation produced by massive galactic central black holes. The findings are reported January 11 in a paper published on arXiv.org. More information: SDSS J211852.96−073227.5: a new blazar-like narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy with flaring γ-ray radiation, arXiv:1801.03963 [astro-ph.HE] arxiv.org/abs/1801.03963AbstractWe report on the identification of a new γ-ray-emitting narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxy, SDSS J211852.96−073227.5 (hereafter J2118−0732). The galaxy, at a redshift of 0.26, is associated with a radio source of flat/inverted spectrum at high radio frequencies. The analysis of its optical spectrum obtained from the SDSS revealed a small line width of the broad component of the Hβ line (FWHM = 1590 km,s−1), making it a radio-loud NLS1 galaxy —- an intriguing class of AGN with exceptional multi-wavelength properties. A new γ-ray source centred at J2118−0732 was sporadically detected during 2009-2013 in form of flares by the {it Fermi}-LAT. Our {it XMM-Newton} observations revealed a flat X-ray spectrum described by a simple power law, and a flux variation by a factor of ∼2.4 in 5~months. The source also shows intraday variability in the IR band. The drop of the broad-band fluxes from the IR, optical to X-ray in 5 months can be modeled by a drop of both the non-thermal jet emission and the emission from an accretion disk, with a decrease of the Eddington ratio by several times, suggesting the coupling of the disk accretion and the jet launching. With the NLS1-blazar composite nucleus, the clear detection of the host galaxy and the synchronous variations in the multiwavelength fluxes and the disk component, J2118−0732 provides a new perspective on the formation and evolution of relativistic jets as well as the disk-jet coupling mechanism. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Researchers discover a blazar-like narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (2018, January 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-blazar-like-narrow-line-seyfert-galaxy.html © 2018 Phys.org Narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies are a class of active galactic nuclei (AGN) that have all the properties of type 1 Seyfert galaxies, but show peculiar characteristic like narrow Balmer lines, strong Fe II emission, and extreme properties in the X-rays.Astronomers and astrophysicists are specially interested in the radio-loud (RL) NLS1 galaxies, which usually showcase a compact radio morphology with a one-sided core-jet structure. Previous studies indicate that some RL NLS1, due to their blazar-like characteristics, produce relativistic jets—beams of ionized matter accelerated close to the speed of light.Therefore, finding and studying new RL NLS1s could help us improve our knowledge about complex phenomena like relativistic jets as the process of their formation and evolution is still not well understood.Now, a team of researchers led by Hui Yang of the Key Laboratory of Space Astronomy and Technology in Beijing, China, has detected new RL NLS1 galaxy emitting gamma-ray radiation. SDSS J211852.96−073227.5 (or J2118−0732 for short) was confirmed as a gamma-ray-emitting RL NLS1 galaxy by observations conducted with Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and with ESA’s X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton), as well as by analysis of data provided by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS).”Here, we present our discovery of a new γ-ray-emitting NLS1–SDSS J211852.96−073227.5 by analyzing the SDSS spectrum, the Fermi-LAT and XMM-Newton observational data,” the scientists wrote in the paper.J2118−0732 was detected at a redshift of 0.26 and has an estimated black hole’s mass of about 33 million solar masses. According to the study, the galaxy’s Balmer and Fe II emission lines confirm its NLS1 nature. Furthermore, data obtained by LAT revealed the existence of gamma-ray emission from J2118−0732 at a relatively high state for about 4 years of observations. Moreover, XMM-Newton observations indicated that J2118−0732 is the brightest X-ray source in the field, exhibiting a large X-ray variability.The researchers noted that properties of J2118−0732 such as large radio loudness, with a flat and inverted radio spectrum and remarkably rapid infrared intraday variability of less than a day, confirm its blazer-like nature.In general, the authors of the paper concluded that the data presented in the study could shed new light on the formation and evolution of relativistic jets and jet-disk coupling.”The broadband SED (spectral energy distribution) can be well modeled by a one-zone leptonic jet model. And the synchronous variations in the multiwavelength fluxes and the disk component suggest the coupling of the disk accretion and the jet launching,” the researchers concluded. Astronomers discover 21 changing-look active galactic nucleilast_img read more

Quantum ghost imaging improved by using fiveatom correlations

first_imgIn conventional imaging methods, a beam of photons (or other particles) is reflected off the object to be imaged. After the beam travels to a detector, the information gathered there is used to create a photograph or other type of image. In an alternative imaging technique called “ghost imaging,” the process works a little differently: an image is reconstructed from information that is detected from a beam that never actually interacts with the object. More information: Sean S. Hodgman, Wei Bu, Sacha B. Mann, Roman I. Khakimov, Andrew G. Truscott. “Higher Order Quantum Ghost Imaging with Ultra-Cold Atoms.” Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.122.233601Also at arXiv:1901.06810 [cond-mat.quant-gas] The key to ghost imaging is to use two or more correlated beams of particles. While one beam interacts with the object, the second beam is detected and used to reconstruct the image, even though the second beam never interacts with the object. The only aspect of the first beam that is detected is the arrival time of each photon on a separate detector. But because the two beams are correlated, the image of the object can be fully reconstructed.While two beams are usually used in ghost imaging, recent research has demonstrated higher-order correlations—that is, correlations among three, four, or five beams. Higher-order ghost imaging can lead to improvements in image visibility, but it comes with the drawback that higher-order correlated events have a lower probability of detection, which causes lower resolution. In a new paper, a team of physicists from the Australian National University in Canberra has achieved two firsts in higher-order ghost imaging: the first demonstration of higher-order ghost imaging with massive particles (they use ultracold helium atoms) and the first higher-order ghost imaging that uses correlated beams from a quantum source. As their quantum source, the researchers used two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates, which are clusters of atoms cooled to near absolute zero. At such cold temperatures, the atoms in a Bose-Einstein condensate clump together and behave like a single giant atom. In their work, the researchers performed experiments using correlations among up to five helium atoms. They demonstrated that, under certain conditions, higher-order ghost imaging with massive particles from a quantum source can improve the visibility of the image without affecting the resolution. “I think the greatest significance of our work is mostly being able to show that such a challenging experiment is possible,” physicist Sean Hodgman at Australian National University, first author of the paper, told Phys.org. “There are a very small number of multi-particle correlated events in a quantum source, which is partially why it has not been demonstrated previously with optics, and this means even after many tens of thousands of experimental runs only very few events are available to reconstruct a ghost image from.”The improvements demonstrated here could be especially beneficial for applications that demand high visibility but are easily damaged. This is because the technique has the potential to reduce the dosage rates, which reduces the potential radiation damage to the sample. One such application is atomic ghost lithography.”Atomic ghost lithography would be like normal atom lithography, but using correlated beams would allow real-time monitoring of the lithographic process,” Hodgman said. “Higher-order correlations would improve ghost lithography by allowing lower fluxes with the same signal quality, which is important as high fluxes risk damage to the sample.”With further work, higher-order quantum ghost imaging could also be used to perform fundamental tests of quantum mechanics, such as demonstrating entanglement among multiple atoms or, in a related vein, making Bell’s inequality measurements using three or more particles. Researchers demonstrate ‘ghost imaging’ with atoms Citation: Quantum ghost imaging improved by using five-atom correlations (2019, June 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-quantum-ghost-imaging-five-atom.html Journal information: Physical Review Letterscenter_img Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2019 Science X Network Schematic of higher-order quantum ghost image demonstration. Credit: Hodgman et al. ©2019 American Physical Societylast_img read more

Heres What Your Favorite Music Says About Your Personality

first_imgYour taste in music could reveal insights into your personality, according to two studies published in Psychological Science. Previous attempts at finding links between music and personality traits didn’t necessarily represent a wide variety of people because the respondents tended to be younger – thus more likely to share similar music tastes – and had varying definitions of the musical genres they were listening to. This time around, more than half of the respondents were older than 22 and all were presented with 25 unfamiliar musical extracts pre-categorized by musicologists. “These results corroborate that music – a form of self-expression that is ubiquitous across human cultures – communicates meaningful information about basic psychological characteristics,” said the authors in their study. Read the whole story: IFLSciencecenter_img Researchers from Cambridge and US universities surveyed more than 21,000 people in two separate online surveys to see how five main personality types known collectively as the Big Five – those that are open-minded, extroverted, agreeable, neurotic, and conscientious – matched up with different genres of music. These included tunes that were mellow, unpretentious, sophisticated, intense, and contemporary. last_img read more

Delhi get ready to be played

Shoelace productions and Aranya brings to the Capital, a unique theatre festival – Prayog, offering three plays to entertain theatre enthusiasts. To be held at LTG auditorium from 26 to 28 October, the plays that will be staged include Illham, Park and Laal Pencil.Manav Kaul, veteran theatre personality, who has penned each of these plays says, ‘I’m quite excited about my plays being staged in Delhi. I’ve been performing in Delhi since 2004 and simply love to see the response of theatre lovers in the city.’ Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Deepak Dhamija, the brain behind Prayog, says, ‘I realised there was a scarcity of playwrights in India. Through this festival we wanted to provide a platform for young contemporary writers.’ Dhamija dubs Prayog as an ‘experiment’.Being staged on 26 October, Illham focuses on the tagline: is Bhagwan the epitome of the mundane? It’s about the life of a middle-aged banker, who is married and has grown up children. However, one day, while sitting on a decrepit park bench he stumbles upon ‘enlightenment’. Therein begins the battle between the world outside and his world inside. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixWhile the second in line is a play titled Park, being staged on 27 October, about any park, just about anywhere, with three regular benches, where three men squabble about the choicest of seats. Because each one’s claim is the greatest and the most fundamental one. Last in row, being staged on 28 October is Laal Pencil based on a Korean novel. It revolves around a young school girl, whose entire life changes when she acquires a magical red pencil. So select your play from Prayog and head to LTG, ensuring a sheer theatrical delight!LOG ON to www.indianstage.in to book tickets right away! read more

final touch

first_imgExperimentation. Entertainment. Instilled with energy. The third phase of Short and Sweet, organised by Shoelace Productions was a complete stunner. Not the conventional words to use in a play review maybe. But these are thoughts that came to mind as the festival draws to a close.Held at Epicenter in Gurgoan, these set of ten plays rocked, as festival director Deepak Dhamija made sure that festival-cum-competition sailed through smoothly.Unbelievably funny, Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Dickheads (offended anybody?) was my personal favourite, which was dished out as a surprise. Written by Ashwath Bhatt and directed by Vivek Shrivastava, this play is about the lives of two street children who eventually become superstars. The story is simple yet compelling, with splendid performances. While 2922, written and directed by Arnav Nanduri and Pranay Manchanda, gets audience attention through a musical journey laced with humour.Who’s the Boss makes you laugh all through, with a secretary sitting on her boss, caught in an uncomfortable situation, being tied together. The lesser said about Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixNine types of Ice the better. Designed and directed by Himanshu Mehta, Chup was more compelling.So was Chairpersons, written and directed by Rajiv Rajaram. It is a political satire, which encapsulates the contemporary Indian political scenario, comparing power dynamics to a game of musical chairs.Smart and slick writing, executed by amazing performances by Rajaram Sandeep John and Nikhil Sriram make this play a treat for theatre lovers.Solitary Creeper , which captures Delhi life as people bump into each other during metro rides was a fun watch. Arvind Gaur’s Khol Do was a compelling watch too with some actors making a lasting impact which includes Shilpi Marwaha and Gaurav Mishra. The evil effects of smoking was nothing more than a over-dramatic monologue. But even A Different Client directed by Vivek Mansukhani, experiments with a different concept complimented by a powerful performance by Mansukhani.After these three rounds, the list of ten plays who have made it to the finale of Short and Sweet, to be held this Friday at Kamani, was announced which includes – 2922, Chairpersons, Dickheads and A Different Client from this round. While from the earlier two rounds, plays which have made it include the superbly humorous Lyra directed and written by Aishwarya Jha Mathur, the amazingly directed The sum of your experiences with the stunning performance of Damandeep Sidhu, well conceptualised and executed Unit Test, superbly performed Between Romeo and Juliet, interestingly executed Gandhi, Chaplin and Salt and Juhi Goel’s fabulous Dhalti Shamein.Catch the the Gala- finale at Kamani on 14th December 7:30 pm, log on to www.bookmyshow.comlast_img read more

For a cause

first_imgStar India, the nation’s leading media and entertainment conglomerate, will strengthen on-going efforts at rehabilitation in flood-ravaged Uttarakhand by raising funds to help bring comfort to victims of this tragedy.Leading actors from Bollywood will join Star’s fund-raiser – a seven-hour marathon event on the occasion of Independence Day – in what’s the first such effort by the entertainment industry to alleviate the sufferings of people impacted by the floods. The entire advertising revenue generated through the event will be channelled to not-for-profit bodies that are working diligently to restore normalcy in Uttarakhand. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’‘The tragedy in Uttarakhand is a solemn opportunity for every Indian to lend a helping hand,’ Uday Shankar, CEO, Star India, said. ‘This occasion demands that people join forces to support those in need. It’s heartening that people are coming together and our role is only that of a catalyst.’Early confirmation of stars supporting the initiative include Indian cinema’s icons Amitabh Bachchan, Lata Mangeshkar, Ajay Devgn, Kajol, Anil Kapoor, AR Rahman, Boman Irani, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, Pritam, Prasoon Joshi, Mukesh Bhatt, Ayushmann Khurana and celebrities from top television shows of the Star network such as Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixDiya Aur Baati Hum, Pyaar Ka Dard Hai Meetha Meetha Pyaara Pyaara, Saraswatichandra, Savdhaan India, Devon Ke Dev Mahadev and India’s Dancing Superstars among others.Film Producers Guild, Federation of Western India Cine Employees, TV Artists Forum, Corporate Charity Trusts and several independent industrialists and donors will partner Star India’s marathon fund-raiser that will be attended by senior leaders from the state and central governments. ‘I am delighted that the Indian film industry has embraced our outreach plan and is partnering with us in this initiative to spread hope,’ Shankar added.last_img read more

Glimpses of those 40 years

first_imgDancer Geeta Chandran is marking four decades since her arangetram in 1974. To mark these 40 glorious year of dancing, Natya Vriksha, with the support of the Ministry of Culture and Pyramid Group is presenting the exhibition, In the Click of a Movment, of iconic photographs by photographer Rakesh Sahai.Sahai has been following the dancer on her creative journey since past five years, and from the dialogue between dancer and photographer has emerged this oeuvre of brilliant images. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’A universally celebrated artiste, a celebrity and a star-performer, Chandran is synonymous with the Indian classical dance – Bharatanatyam. She began learning Bharatanatyam from the tender age of five years under the tutelage of Swarna Saraswathy.In her dance presentations Chandran skillfully weaves abstract notions of joy, beauty, values, aspirations, myth and spirituality. She is celebrated not only for her deep and composite understanding of the art of Bharatanatyam, but also for her Carnatic music, her work in television, video and film, theatre, choreography, dance education,dance activism and dance-issue journalism. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixChandran is a recipient of several prestigious awards including the Lady Shri Ram College Illustrious Alumna Award, the Dandayudhapani Pillai Award, the Bharat Nirman Award, the NatyaIlavarasi, the Indira Priyadarshini Award, the Media India Award, the National Critics Award, the Guru Deba Prasad Das Award, the Sringar Mani and the NatyaRatna.When: 25 – 30 September Where: India Habitat Centre Lobby, Lodi Road Timing: 10 am to 8 pmlast_img read more