Tickets now on sale for the Sean Hogan, CDC Benefit Show

first_img Tickets are now on sale for the Sean Hogan, Child Development Centre Benefit show on Friday March 19th. – Advertisement -The Child Development Centre is looking to raise $200,000 for their new building, “Project Build a Fort”. To help, Moose FM is organizing two major events. This benefit show, will feature Canadian Country Music Award winner Sean Hogan and local artist Jordyn Leigh Busche.The show will take place on Friday March 19th at the Pomeroy Hotel. Tickets are now on sale at the Pomeroy Hotel and the cost is only $40 per person. This show wouldn’t be possible if not for the generous support of Chances Fort St. John, the Pomeroy Hotel, Systems by Trail and M&M Meats.Moose FM is also gearing up for the annual Arctech Welding and Machining A Day for the Kids fundraiser Thursday March 4th. This is the 6th year for the fundraiser and each year the community comes out and supports the Child Development Centre. This year we’ll broadcast live from Pricesmart from 6am to 6pm looking for your help. You’ll be able to donate in person, online or by phone.The Child Development Centre works with families in Fort St. John and the surrounding area’s who have children with a broad range of developmental delays and special needs. For more information on the services the CDC provides visit www.cdcfsj.ca. The Child Development Centre hopes to raise over $200,000 with all of it going towards project “Build a Fort”. Show your support for the CDC.If you’d like to help raise funds for the Child Development Centre let us know by calling 250-787-7100 or e-mail areaburn@moosefm.caAdvertisementlast_img read more

Construction set to begin for 41-acre Sun Valley park

first_img“I’m committed to bringing the people of Sun Valley a place of rest and recreation. If you’re 80 years old or 8 months old, you will enjoy this park.” When the Sheldon-Arleta dump filled up in 1974, it was covered with dirt and a system for landfill gas treatment was installed. Located near the intersection of the 170 and 5 freeways, the dump site has rattled the nerves of neighbors who worry about methane leaks. Now that the dump has had a chance to settle, city engineers are replacing its outdated gas collection system with five miles of new pipe. Phase I of the recreation center, set for completion by 2008, also will include 100 new or refurbished gas wells and a new flaring station. “This satisfies the needs of the entire community,” said Al Piantanida of Arleta, a community activist who once dumped car batteries at the old landfill. “Phase I is the biggest part of the deal.” Money permitting, the park will include soccer fields, baseball and softball fields, basketball courts, a community center and paths for walking or jogging. Of its projected $35 million cost, two-thirds has been raised by voter-initiated Proposition O watershed funds and other sources. The Department of Water & Power, which contributed $5 million, expects to capture 45,000 acre-feet for groundwater reclamation. Residents and officials hailed the park – to be built near two high schools – as a future recreational hub for the northeast San Fernando Valley. A victim of industrial blight, Sun Valley was declared the city’s first Environmental Justice Improvement Area. Tree coverage is estimated at 13 percent, among the lowest rate in the city. “This is a wonderful day for the community,” said Jon Kirk Mukri, general manager for the Department of Recreation and Parks. “I was born in Pacoima … and I couldn’t be prouder to be part of taking a landfill and turning it into a park. “We need parks to build communities, to be the cultural heritage of our future – and what better way than to name it after Cesar Chavez.” D.J. Gay, one of a dozen Polytechnic High School students to attend the ceremony, said the park will provide a badly needed place to play ball. “I think this is a great achievement, something the community needs, a place to get away,” said Gay, 18, of Sun Valley and a Poly varsity basketball point guard. “This provides more freedom for people.” dana.bartholomew@dailynews.com (818) 713-3730160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SUN VALLEY – For years, neighbors wrinkled their noses at the stinking dump, where cackling sea gulls swirled overhead. Three decades after the last trash truck rolled into the Sheldon-Arleta landfill, a 41-acre recreational park will be built on top of its dirt-covered garbage. City officials broke ground Thursday on the $35 million Cesar Chavez Recreation Complex set to become an oasis of ball fields and bike paths by 2011. “This is our baby, the community’s baby,” said Councilman Tony Cardenas during a windblown ceremony of top officials from the city’s water, recreation, engineering, environmental and sanitation departments. last_img read more

L.A. area West’s priciest rental market

first_imgApartment rents remained the cheapest in Tucson, Ariz. at $655 per month, a 4.6 percent increase. Colorado Springs, Colo. was the only major market where apartment rents declined during the past year. Apartment rents there dipped 1.7 percent to $699 in March.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SAN FRANCISCO – The Los Angeles area remained the West’s most expensive for apartments in the first quarter as fewer home sales translated into higher rents, according to data to be released Thursday. In Los Angeles and Orange counties, the average apartment went for $1,588 in March, a 7.2 percent increase from last year, according to the research firm RealFacts Inc. Through March, rents climbed by at least 4 percent from the previous year in 13 of the 20 major Western markets surveyed each quarter by the research firm RealFacts Inc. Renting an average apartment now costs at least $1,000 per month in eight of the markets covered by RealFacts. The Seattle market joined the $1,000 club for the first time in March, propelled by a 9.1 percent increase from last year. All the other $1,000 apartment markets are in California. The spike in apartment rents coincided with a deepening slump in home sales as eroding property values discouraged people from buying real estate. Foreclosures also have been rising, prompting lenders to tighten their lending standards – a factor that is making it more difficult for borrowers to qualify for a mortgage, especially if they have blemished credit records. With more people leasing instead of buying, apartment landlords have been able to raise rents more easily. Robust job growth in many markets also is providing the means for more people to rent. Apartment demand is particularly intense in Silicon Valley, where the technology industry has bounced back from the dot-com bust and home prices remain among the nation’s highest. The average apartment rent in the San Jose metropolitan area – Silicon Valley’s hub – has shot up by 12.1 percent over the past year to $1,522 through March. The apartment vacancy rate in the region stood at just 3.5 percent through March. Even so, San Jose rents are still well below their peak of $1,959 per month reached in early 2001, just before paychecks began to evaporate in the dot-com bust. last_img read more

Food versus fuel

first_imgMINNEAPOLIS One agribusiness giant is enthusiastic about using farmland to produce fuel. Another says growing food should be the top priority for those fields. Archer Daniels Midland Co., by far the country’s largest ethanol producer, has taken an aggressive approach to biofuels including ethanol and biodiesel. Cargill Inc. has been more restrained, though it’s hardly sitting on the sidelines. Recent comments by the chairmen of both companies mirror a larger debate taking place on how big of a contribution ethanol can make toward reducing America’s need for oil imports, and whether using more corn to make more fuel will lead to higher food prices. Minnetonka-based Cargill raised the food-versus-fuel issue earlier this month. As he laid out a broad vision of Cargill’s business on a changing global playing field, Warren Staley, its chairman and CEO, told a gathering of business writers here that he saw producing food as the most important task for agriculture. Noting that a number of countries are looking at ethanol and biodiesel to lessen their dependence on Mideast oil, Staley said, “We have to look at the hierarchy of value for agricultural land use: food first, then feed and last fuel.” Staley questioned whether subsidies for using land to produce fuel were good long-term policy and questioned the idea that ethanol could put a big dent in America’s dependence on foreign oil. Even if the entire U.S. corn crop were used for ethanol, it would replace only about 20 percent of domestic gasoline consumption, he said. The next day, the chairman of ADM, G. Allen Andreas, responded by insisting the world has plenty of capacity to grow food. “There is no consumption versus combustion debate, except for those who really don’t recognize the realities of the way this business functions,” he said in a conference call with analysts. Malnutrition and hunger, he said, come from “a lack of infrastructure and a lack of capital” around the world, not from diverting some food to fuel uses. Neither company made its executives available to elaborate on the comments. Bill Brady, a Cargill spokesman, said one of Staley’s main points is that the company sees itself first as a food company. ADM has seen a sharp run-up in its stock price, partly due to investors looking for ways to get in on the ethanol boom. Its shares reached an all-time high of $46.71 last Thursday. It was trading in the $18-$19 range a year ago. Cargill is privately held. In his speech, Staley said Cargill’s sales revenues have increased from $48 billion in 2001 to $71 billion in 2005 and will rise again in the fiscal year that ends May 31, but did not break out how much of that growth came from ethanol. Ethanol plays a much bigger role for Decatur, Ill.-based ADM, which claims about one-fourth of U.S. ethanol capacity. About 5 percent of its revenue comes from ethanol, and it’s aiming to boost annual production to 1.5 billion gallons, up from its current 1 billion. And in what’s been widely seen as a sign of the importance of ethanol in ADM’s future, ADM went to the oil industry for its newest leader. Last month it hired Patricia Woertz, a former executive vice president at Chevron Corp., as its CEO and president. Steve Suppan, director of research for the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, a Minneapolis-based think tank, said ADM has reaped big dividends from lobbying the government over ethanol subsidies and mandates for its increased use in gasoline. Since Cargill is larger and more diversified, it doesn’t need to place as big of a bet on ethanol as ADM, Suppan said. Cargill’s nonfood businesses include marketing electricity, making and trading steel, and offering financial risk-management products to companies. “ADM is famous for their willingness to spend lots of money on lobbying,” agreed Hank Williams, vice president for fuels with Jim Jordan & Associates, a Houston-based consulting company. “… They may very well have plans to further those efforts and help themselves to larger markets in the future.” But Cargill, despite Staley’s comments, is making its own substantial investments in biofuels $1 billion worth. Currently No. 4 in U.S. ethanol production, it plans new plants that would push its annual capacity to 230 million gallons, which would put it close to the No. 2 spot. And it has a joint venture with Monsanto Co. that’s developing new production technologies. Both Cargill and ADM also have significant biodiesel expansions under way, mostly in Europe. One reason for Cargill’s relative restraint is that it generally views subsidized industries with caution because subsidies can change over time, Brady said. Congress passed the Energy Policy Act last July that mandates doubling the use of ethanol in gasoline to 7.5 billion gallons by 2012, and President George W. Bush gave the industry a strong endorsement in his State of the Union speech in January. The U.S. now has 97 ethanol plants with an annual capacity of nearly 4.5 billion gallons, according to the Renewable Fuels Association. About 39 percent of that capacity is farmer-owned. An additional 35 plants and nine expansions with a combined capacity of more than 2.2 billion are under construction, the trade group says. Daniel Kammen, director of the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory at the University of California at Berkeley, said the food-versus-fuel debate is “a big red herring” because the U.S. “by any measure is an overproducer of food.” “A richer farm sector is going to make us more secure, it’s going to make more food available,” Kammen said. But Williams, the consultant, said concerns about food versus fuel are valid. About 15 percent of the U.S. corn crop is currently used for ethanol, and new and expanded plants easily could raise that to 45 percent to 50 percent, he said. “Which is probably not sustainable,” he added. “We have people to feed, animals to feed, and exports of corn that need to be made.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBasketball roundup: Sierra Canyon, Birmingham set to face off in tournament quarterfinals160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! 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DONEGAL CAMP HIT WITH FLU BUG

first_imgDonegal boss Jim McGuinness has been prevented from naming his squad for Sunday’s McKenna Cup game against Tyrone after an outbreak of flu amongst his team.A number of leading players including Neil Gallagher, Kevin Cassidy, Daniel McLaughlin and Kevin Mulhern are all believed to have been struck down with the condition.The four players all missed this week’s training session in Castlefin and it is unknown if any will take part in the game at this stage. In fact, it is likely that McGuinness will delay naming his team until just before the game at Healy Park in Omagh throw-in 2pm.The game will be a much anticipated curtain-raiser for McGuinness’ senior managerial career after a successful spell as Under 21 boss.McGuinness, who is highly-rated amongst a number of pundits and former players as having the potential to make things happen for Donegal, knows what he wants from his team.He said he needs to get his players showing some spark again and playing for the jersey of their county. The last times the sides met Donegal came out on top in the early stages of the McKenna Cup with the help of a stunning 2-09 contribution from Glenswilly man Michael Murphy which helped Donegal win the encounter.EndsDONEGAL CAMP HIT WITH FLU BUG was last modified: January 7th, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

SHAY GIVEN SET FOR ANFIELD IN LIVERPOOL SWITCH

first_imgDONEGAL soccer star Shay Given is set to add Liverpool Football Club to his CV.Several Merseyside news reports say the Lifford man will be at Anfield today for Liverpool’s clash with Manchester United ahead of completing a move to be the Reds No2 keeper.Brendan Rodgers wants Given’s experience as back up to new keeper Simon Mignolet. Shay has been told he is no longer wanted at Aston Villa and it looked as though he was on his way to Doncaster Rovers.However the 37-year-old looks set to move to Liverpool, and will probably feature in the side’s Cup matches through the season.It’s understood he may also be offered a goalkeeper coaching role as part of the deal. SHAY GIVEN SET FOR ANFIELD IN LIVERPOOL SWITCH was last modified: September 1st, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Aston VillaLiverpoolShay Givenlast_img read more

THIEVES TARGET FOUR MASTERS GAA PLAYERS DURING TRAINING

first_imgTHIEVES are targeting GAA players’ cars during training, Donegal gardai warned today.Four cars belonging to players at the Four Masters GAA club in Donegal town were robbed last Friday evening.Gardai are now warning GAA players across the county to ensure they don’t leave any valuables in their cars while training or during football matches. During last Friday’s raid, thieves smashed their way into three cars and made off with personal belongings and a substantial sum of cash. Some of the property has since been recovered.Gardai in Donegal Town are appealing for witnesses to the incident to contact them or anyone who noticed anything suspicious in the area of the Four Masters GAA grounds around 9pm last Friday to contact them on 0749721021.Garda sergeant Tony Curneen warned car owners to take belongings with them.THIEVES TARGET FOUR MASTERS GAA PLAYERS DURING TRAINING was last modified: August 16th, 2011 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:four masters donegal townfour masters gaa clibtheftlast_img read more

ESB POSTPONES PLANS TO CUT OFF SUPPLY TO LETTERKENNY HOUSING ESTATES

first_imgThe ESB has postponed a plan to cut the electricity supply to the sewage system at a number of housing estates in Letterkenny.It had been claimed that the developer of the estates which include College Park and surrounding areas, owed €4,000 from an outstanding electricity bill.The developer has since gone into liquidation. Letterkenny Town Mayor Gerry McMonagle says he has been told by the ESB that they will not cut of the electricity on November 21st next.However he denied the residents will have to pick up the tab.In fact Cllr McMonagle said the town council must step up to the plate and take some responsibility for the bill.“It is my belief the council should pay the bill and look at as they enter into discussions going forward,” he said. “After the initial letter they (the ESB) have copped themselves on and we can now sort this out,” he said.ESB POSTPONES PLANS TO CUT OFF SUPPLY TO LETTERKENNY HOUSING ESTATES was last modified: November 15th, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:CLLR GERRY MCMONAGLECOLLEGE PARKESBlast_img read more

WORLD SIGHT DAY: NOT ENOUGH BEING DONE TO STOP PREVENTABLE CONDITIONS, SAYS MEP

first_imgIndependent MEP Marian Harkin has used today – World Sight Day – to call for targeted awareness campaigns on preventable sight conditions.Harkin noted that National Council for the Blind of Ireland (NCBI) statistics from 2010 showed that the direct cost of vision impairment to the Irish health care system is estimated at 116 million Euro. This figure is expected to rise to 136 million by 2020.“These increasing costs can be prevented, and many people’s quality of life improved, if effective awareness campaigns encourage Irish citizens to go for testing,” she said. “In particular,” Harkin added, “quality screening of high risk groups, such as elderly people and diabetes sufferers, could go a long way to prevent further sight deterioration.”The Ireland North & West MEP said that “all too often we take our eyesight for granted, and if we want these campaigns to succeed, people must regard taking an eye test as being as easy and convenient as taking a cholesterol test.” WORLD SIGHT DAY: NOT ENOUGH BEING DONE TO STOP PREVENTABLE CONDITIONS, SAYS MEP was last modified: October 11th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:SAYS MEPWORLD SIGHT DAY: NOT ENOUGH BEING DONE TO STOP PREVENTABLE CONDITIONSlast_img read more

Hiddink ‘targets QPR striker’

first_imgBobby Zamora is a shock target for mega-rich Russian club Anzhi Makhachkala, it is claimed.Zamora left Fulham in January.Zamora only joined QPR from Fulham in January but The People say Anzhi boss Guus Hiddink is planning to launch a bid for him in the summer.The People also say Cardiff are trying to sign Tommy Smith on loan – despite R’s boss Mark Hughes making it clear he will not allow any of his 25-man squad to leave – and that Middlesbrough want to sign young centre-back Dan Burn from Fulham.Related story: Smith and Mackie staying at QPR, says boss (2 February)The paper also suggest Manchester United are on the trail of Fulham playmaker Moussa Dembele.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img